Effects of 17β-estradiol (E2) on aqueous organisms and its treatment problem

A review

Emad Nazari, Fatihah Suja`

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

12 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Natural estrogens, estrone (E1), 17β-estradiol (E2) and estriol (E3) are endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) that are discharged consistently and directly into surface waters with wastewater treatment plants (WWPTs) effluents, disposal sludges and in storm-water runoff. The most common and highest potential natural estrogen that causes estrogen activity in wastewater influent is E2. This review describes and attempts to summarize the main problems involved in the removal of E2 from WWTP by traditional processes, which fundamentally rely on activated sludge and provide an insufficient treatment for E2, as well as advanced oxidation processes (AOPs) that are applied in tertiary section treatment works. Biological processes affect and play an important role in the degradation of E2. However, some investigations have reported that operations that rely on high retention times have low efficiencies. Although advanced treatment technologies are available, their cost and operational considerations do not make them sustainable solutions. Therefore, E2 is still being released into aqueous areas, as shown in this study that investigates results from different countries. E2 is present on the watch list of substances in the Water Framework Directive (WFD) of the European Union since 2013 and the minimum acceptable concentration of it is 0.4 ng/L.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)465-491
Number of pages27
JournalReviews on Environmental Health
Volume31
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Dec 2016

Fingerprint

Estradiol
Estrogens
Waste Water
Sewage
water
Water
Sludge disposal
Biological Phenomena
Endocrine Disruptors
Estriol
Estrone
European Union
Runoff
Surface waters
Wastewater treatment
Effluents
Wastewater
Technology
Costs and Cost Analysis
Degradation

Keywords

  • 17β-estradiol (E2)
  • advanced oxidation processes (AOPs)
  • aqueous area
  • degradation
  • endocrine disruption
  • wastewater treatment plant

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health(social science)
  • Medicine(all)
  • Pollution
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

Effects of 17β-estradiol (E2) on aqueous organisms and its treatment problem : A review. / Nazari, Emad; Suja`, Fatihah.

In: Reviews on Environmental Health, Vol. 31, No. 4, 01.12.2016, p. 465-491.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

@article{5164fc215f75426c8bd6dc508213d499,
title = "Effects of 17β-estradiol (E2) on aqueous organisms and its treatment problem: A review",
abstract = "Natural estrogens, estrone (E1), 17β-estradiol (E2) and estriol (E3) are endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) that are discharged consistently and directly into surface waters with wastewater treatment plants (WWPTs) effluents, disposal sludges and in storm-water runoff. The most common and highest potential natural estrogen that causes estrogen activity in wastewater influent is E2. This review describes and attempts to summarize the main problems involved in the removal of E2 from WWTP by traditional processes, which fundamentally rely on activated sludge and provide an insufficient treatment for E2, as well as advanced oxidation processes (AOPs) that are applied in tertiary section treatment works. Biological processes affect and play an important role in the degradation of E2. However, some investigations have reported that operations that rely on high retention times have low efficiencies. Although advanced treatment technologies are available, their cost and operational considerations do not make them sustainable solutions. Therefore, E2 is still being released into aqueous areas, as shown in this study that investigates results from different countries. E2 is present on the watch list of substances in the Water Framework Directive (WFD) of the European Union since 2013 and the minimum acceptable concentration of it is 0.4 ng/L.",
keywords = "17β-estradiol (E2), advanced oxidation processes (AOPs), aqueous area, degradation, endocrine disruption, wastewater treatment plant",
author = "Emad Nazari and Fatihah Suja`",
year = "2016",
month = "12",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1515/reveh-2016-0040",
language = "English",
volume = "31",
pages = "465--491",
journal = "Reviews on Environmental Health",
issn = "0048-7554",
publisher = "Walter de Gruyter GmbH & Co. KG",
number = "4",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Effects of 17β-estradiol (E2) on aqueous organisms and its treatment problem

T2 - A review

AU - Nazari, Emad

AU - Suja`, Fatihah

PY - 2016/12/1

Y1 - 2016/12/1

N2 - Natural estrogens, estrone (E1), 17β-estradiol (E2) and estriol (E3) are endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) that are discharged consistently and directly into surface waters with wastewater treatment plants (WWPTs) effluents, disposal sludges and in storm-water runoff. The most common and highest potential natural estrogen that causes estrogen activity in wastewater influent is E2. This review describes and attempts to summarize the main problems involved in the removal of E2 from WWTP by traditional processes, which fundamentally rely on activated sludge and provide an insufficient treatment for E2, as well as advanced oxidation processes (AOPs) that are applied in tertiary section treatment works. Biological processes affect and play an important role in the degradation of E2. However, some investigations have reported that operations that rely on high retention times have low efficiencies. Although advanced treatment technologies are available, their cost and operational considerations do not make them sustainable solutions. Therefore, E2 is still being released into aqueous areas, as shown in this study that investigates results from different countries. E2 is present on the watch list of substances in the Water Framework Directive (WFD) of the European Union since 2013 and the minimum acceptable concentration of it is 0.4 ng/L.

AB - Natural estrogens, estrone (E1), 17β-estradiol (E2) and estriol (E3) are endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) that are discharged consistently and directly into surface waters with wastewater treatment plants (WWPTs) effluents, disposal sludges and in storm-water runoff. The most common and highest potential natural estrogen that causes estrogen activity in wastewater influent is E2. This review describes and attempts to summarize the main problems involved in the removal of E2 from WWTP by traditional processes, which fundamentally rely on activated sludge and provide an insufficient treatment for E2, as well as advanced oxidation processes (AOPs) that are applied in tertiary section treatment works. Biological processes affect and play an important role in the degradation of E2. However, some investigations have reported that operations that rely on high retention times have low efficiencies. Although advanced treatment technologies are available, their cost and operational considerations do not make them sustainable solutions. Therefore, E2 is still being released into aqueous areas, as shown in this study that investigates results from different countries. E2 is present on the watch list of substances in the Water Framework Directive (WFD) of the European Union since 2013 and the minimum acceptable concentration of it is 0.4 ng/L.

KW - 17β-estradiol (E2)

KW - advanced oxidation processes (AOPs)

KW - aqueous area

KW - degradation

KW - endocrine disruption

KW - wastewater treatment plant

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85001948935&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85001948935&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1515/reveh-2016-0040

DO - 10.1515/reveh-2016-0040

M3 - Review article

VL - 31

SP - 465

EP - 491

JO - Reviews on Environmental Health

JF - Reviews on Environmental Health

SN - 0048-7554

IS - 4

ER -