Effectiveness of home-based carer-assisted in comparison to hospital-based therapist-delivered therapy for people with stroke: A randomised controlled trial

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

BACKGROUND: The benefits of engaging informal carers or family in the delivery of therapy intervention for people with stroke have not been well researched. OBJECTIVES: To assess the effectiveness of a home-based carer-assisted in comparison to hospital-based therapist-delivered therapy for community-dwelling stroke survivors. METHODS: An assessor blinded randomised controlled trial was conducted on 91 stroke survivors (mean age 58.9±10.6 years, median time post-onset 13.0 months, 76.5% males) who had completed individual rehabilitation. The control group received hospital-based group therapy delivered by physiotherapists as out-patients and the test group was assigned to a home-based carer-assisted therapy. Targeted primary outcomes were physical functions (mobility, balance, lower limb strength and gait speed). A secondary outcome index was health-related quality of life. An intention-to-treat analysis was used to evaluate outcomes at week 12 of intervention. RESULTS: Both therapy groups improved significantly in all the functional measures; mobility (p<0.01), balance (p<0.01), lower limb strength (p<0.01), gait speed (p<.05), and in the quality of life score (p<0.05) at trial completion. No statistical differences were found between the two groups in any outcome indices (all p>0.05). CONCLUSIONS: The home-based carer-assisted therapy is as effective as the hospital-based therapist-delivered training in improving post-stroke functions and quality of life.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)87-97
Number of pages11
JournalNeuroRehabilitation
Volume45
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jan 2019

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Caregivers
Randomized Controlled Trials
Stroke
Group Psychotherapy
Survivors
Quality of Life
Independent Living
Intention to Treat Analysis
Physical Therapists
Therapeutics
Lower Extremity
Outpatients
Rehabilitation
Control Groups

Keywords

  • carer
  • functional outcome
  • home-based therapy
  • quality of life
  • Stroke

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physical Therapy, Sports Therapy and Rehabilitation
  • Rehabilitation
  • Clinical Neurology

Cite this

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title = "Effectiveness of home-based carer-assisted in comparison to hospital-based therapist-delivered therapy for people with stroke: A randomised controlled trial",
abstract = "BACKGROUND: The benefits of engaging informal carers or family in the delivery of therapy intervention for people with stroke have not been well researched. OBJECTIVES: To assess the effectiveness of a home-based carer-assisted in comparison to hospital-based therapist-delivered therapy for community-dwelling stroke survivors. METHODS: An assessor blinded randomised controlled trial was conducted on 91 stroke survivors (mean age 58.9±10.6 years, median time post-onset 13.0 months, 76.5{\%} males) who had completed individual rehabilitation. The control group received hospital-based group therapy delivered by physiotherapists as out-patients and the test group was assigned to a home-based carer-assisted therapy. Targeted primary outcomes were physical functions (mobility, balance, lower limb strength and gait speed). A secondary outcome index was health-related quality of life. An intention-to-treat analysis was used to evaluate outcomes at week 12 of intervention. RESULTS: Both therapy groups improved significantly in all the functional measures; mobility (p<0.01), balance (p<0.01), lower limb strength (p<0.01), gait speed (p<.05), and in the quality of life score (p<0.05) at trial completion. No statistical differences were found between the two groups in any outcome indices (all p>0.05). CONCLUSIONS: The home-based carer-assisted therapy is as effective as the hospital-based therapist-delivered training in improving post-stroke functions and quality of life.",
keywords = "carer, functional outcome, home-based therapy, quality of life, Stroke",
author = "Nordin, {Nor Azlin Mohd} and Aziz, {Noor Azah} and Saperi Sulong and Aljunid, {Syed Mohamed}",
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T2 - A randomised controlled trial

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AU - Aziz, Noor Azah

AU - Sulong, Saperi

AU - Aljunid, Syed Mohamed

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N2 - BACKGROUND: The benefits of engaging informal carers or family in the delivery of therapy intervention for people with stroke have not been well researched. OBJECTIVES: To assess the effectiveness of a home-based carer-assisted in comparison to hospital-based therapist-delivered therapy for community-dwelling stroke survivors. METHODS: An assessor blinded randomised controlled trial was conducted on 91 stroke survivors (mean age 58.9±10.6 years, median time post-onset 13.0 months, 76.5% males) who had completed individual rehabilitation. The control group received hospital-based group therapy delivered by physiotherapists as out-patients and the test group was assigned to a home-based carer-assisted therapy. Targeted primary outcomes were physical functions (mobility, balance, lower limb strength and gait speed). A secondary outcome index was health-related quality of life. An intention-to-treat analysis was used to evaluate outcomes at week 12 of intervention. RESULTS: Both therapy groups improved significantly in all the functional measures; mobility (p<0.01), balance (p<0.01), lower limb strength (p<0.01), gait speed (p<.05), and in the quality of life score (p<0.05) at trial completion. No statistical differences were found between the two groups in any outcome indices (all p>0.05). CONCLUSIONS: The home-based carer-assisted therapy is as effective as the hospital-based therapist-delivered training in improving post-stroke functions and quality of life.

AB - BACKGROUND: The benefits of engaging informal carers or family in the delivery of therapy intervention for people with stroke have not been well researched. OBJECTIVES: To assess the effectiveness of a home-based carer-assisted in comparison to hospital-based therapist-delivered therapy for community-dwelling stroke survivors. METHODS: An assessor blinded randomised controlled trial was conducted on 91 stroke survivors (mean age 58.9±10.6 years, median time post-onset 13.0 months, 76.5% males) who had completed individual rehabilitation. The control group received hospital-based group therapy delivered by physiotherapists as out-patients and the test group was assigned to a home-based carer-assisted therapy. Targeted primary outcomes were physical functions (mobility, balance, lower limb strength and gait speed). A secondary outcome index was health-related quality of life. An intention-to-treat analysis was used to evaluate outcomes at week 12 of intervention. RESULTS: Both therapy groups improved significantly in all the functional measures; mobility (p<0.01), balance (p<0.01), lower limb strength (p<0.01), gait speed (p<.05), and in the quality of life score (p<0.05) at trial completion. No statistical differences were found between the two groups in any outcome indices (all p>0.05). CONCLUSIONS: The home-based carer-assisted therapy is as effective as the hospital-based therapist-delivered training in improving post-stroke functions and quality of life.

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