Effect of workstress and smoking towards sperm quality among infertile male

Khairul Osman, Rafeah Pakri Mohamed, Mohd Hashim Omar, Siti Fatimah Ibrahim, Norhamizan Hashim

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Male infertility is a relatively common condition affecting approximately 1 in 20 of the male population. DNA fragmentation is an important factor in the etiology of male infertility. Men with high DNA fragmentation levels have significantly lower odds of conceiving, naturally or through procedures such as intrauterine insemination and IVF. The most common contributing factor of male infertility is smoking. Studies have shown that smoking intensity is positively associated with job demands and stress. Therefore, we believe that work stress increases the nicotine-dependent thus causing lower male fertility rate. As proper protamine to histone ratio is essential to produce viable sperm, smoking is strongly suspected to reduce sperm viability through histone-to-protamine transition abnormalities. These abnormalities, results in sperm with high DNA damage when exposed to excessive free radical. This present study was undertaken to evaluate the relationship of work stress, smoking and sperm quality. A total of 210 infertile patients attending Medical Assisted Contraceptive Clinic (MAC), UKMMC were selected for the study. Smoking status and stress level of patients were collected after obtaining relevant consent. Histone-to-protamine ratio was acquired using Aniline Blue staining and Chromomycin A3 staining respectively. Sperm DNA fragmentation was estimated using Comet Assay. Result revealed that smokers tend to be more stressful (r = .446, p < . 001). The result showed a significantly increased level of histone (r = .385, p < . 001) and incomplete protamination (r = .492, p < . 001) in smokers. The imbalance of histone-to-protamine ratio lead to increase of DNA damage. All the data were analyzed using SPSS version 20.0. Result revealed that patients who smoke are more stressful at work. Higher proportion of abnormal sperm histone to protamine ratio were found among smokers suggesting that cigarette smoking may inversely affect male fertility.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)33-40
Number of pages8
JournalMalaysian Journal of Public Health Medicine
Volume2018
Issue numberSpecialissue1
Publication statusPublished - 31 Mar 2018

Fingerprint

Protamines
Histones
Spermatozoa
Smoking
Male Infertility
DNA Fragmentation
DNA Damage
Chromomycin A3
Staining and Labeling
Comet Assay
Insemination
Birth Rate
Contraceptive Agents
Nicotine
Smoke
Free Radicals
Fertility
Population

Keywords

  • Male
  • Smoking
  • Sperm quality
  • Stress

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

Effect of workstress and smoking towards sperm quality among infertile male. / Osman, Khairul; Mohamed, Rafeah Pakri; Omar, Mohd Hashim; Ibrahim, Siti Fatimah; Hashim, Norhamizan.

In: Malaysian Journal of Public Health Medicine, Vol. 2018, No. Specialissue1, 31.03.2018, p. 33-40.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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