Effect of wall surface properties at different drying kinetics on the deposition problem in spray drying

Meng Wai Woo, Wan Ramli Wan Daud, Siti Masrinda Tasirin, Meor Zainal Meor Talib

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

27 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Current methods in alleviating the wall deposition problem in spray drying emphasize mainly controlling the stickiness of the drying particles and less attention is placed on the properties of the dryer wall. In this experimental study, the effect of wall surface properties on the deposition mechanism has been investigated. Properties considered in classifying different wall materials were surface energy, roughness, and dielectric properties. The model solution contained sucrose, representing low-molecular-weight sugars commonly encountered in spray drying of fruit and vegetable juices. The effect of wall properties on deposition was explored at different drying rates producing particles of different surface rigidity. Larger surface roughness produced higher deposition fluxes for particles with high impact velocity and moisture. Surface energy and surface roughness were found to have no significant effect for dry rigid particles at the middle and bottom elevation of the drying chamber. However, material with lower surface energy (Teflon) exhibited less deposition for rubbery particles at such elevations. Analysis shows that dielectric wall material (Teflon) tends to enhance deposition of dry particles because of attrition at the surface. Higher wall temperature was found to produce slightly more deposition. The results of this work give a general indication of the effect of wall material on the deposition problem and provide the fundamental understanding for further studies along this line. Proper selection of dryer wall material will provide potential alternatives for reducing the deposition problem.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)15-26
Number of pages12
JournalDrying Technology
Volume26
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan 2008

Fingerprint

Spray drying
surface properties
drying
Surface properties
sprayers
Drying
Kinetics
kinetics
Interfacial energy
surface energy
drying apparatus
Surface roughness
teflon (trademark)
Polytetrafluoroethylene
Sugar (sucrose)
Polytetrafluoroethylenes
surface roughness
roughness
juices
comminution

Keywords

  • Deposition
  • Fruit juices
  • Spray drying
  • Surface energy
  • Wall materials

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Chemical Engineering (miscellaneous)

Cite this

Effect of wall surface properties at different drying kinetics on the deposition problem in spray drying. / Woo, Meng Wai; Wan Daud, Wan Ramli; Tasirin, Siti Masrinda; Meor Talib, Meor Zainal.

In: Drying Technology, Vol. 26, No. 1, 01.2008, p. 15-26.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Woo, Meng Wai ; Wan Daud, Wan Ramli ; Tasirin, Siti Masrinda ; Meor Talib, Meor Zainal. / Effect of wall surface properties at different drying kinetics on the deposition problem in spray drying. In: Drying Technology. 2008 ; Vol. 26, No. 1. pp. 15-26.
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