Effect of tocotrienol on lipid peroxidation in experimental gastritis induced by restraint stress

Nur Azlina Mohd Fahami, M. I. Nafeeza

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

14 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Damage to gastric mucosa caused by restraint stress has been attributed to impaired blood flow that resulted in ischemia followed by reperfusion, a process that generates free radicals. Therefore oxygen radicals may mediate the lesions produced in restraint stress. To test this hypothesis, we studied the effect of free radical scavengers on restraint-induced lesions in rats. Forty rats were divided in to four groups of 10 rats. Two control groups was fed with a normal rat diet and two treatment groups fed with a vitamin E deficient diet with either tocopherol or tocotrienol, which serves as free radical scavengers. The two forms of vitamin E were administered orally at 60mg/kg body weight for 28 days. After 28 days, rats from one control group and the two treated groups were subjected to restraint stress 2 hours daily for 4 consecutive days. The rats were killed after the fourth exposure, their stomach isolated and examined for lesions, and gastric malondialdehyde (MOA) content and the gastric reduced glutathione level were measured as an index to reflect the scavenging abilities of tocopherol and tocotrienol. Both the regimes significantly attenuated the total lesion area in the stomach compared to the control. The MOA content was also significantly lower in the rats given tocopherol and tocotrienol supplementation compared to the control and the reduced glutathione levels were preserved in rats supplemented with both tocopherol and tocotrienol. We conclude that it is indeed probable that oxygen radical is involved in the pathogenesis of restraint stress-induced lesions thus supplementation with antioxidant such as vitamin E may be able to reduce or inhibit the formation of these lesions.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)69-72
Number of pages4
JournalPakistan Journal of Nutrition
Volume4
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2005

Fingerprint

Tocotrienols
tocotrienols
gastritis
Gastritis
Lipid Peroxidation
lipid peroxidation
lesions (animal)
Tocopherols
rats
tocopherols
stomach
Vitamin E
vitamin E
Stomach
Free Radical Scavengers
free radical scavengers
Malondialdehyde
malondialdehyde
Glutathione
glutathione

Keywords

  • Gastric lesions
  • Peroxidation
  • Restraint-stress
  • Tocopherol
  • Tocotrienol

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Food Science
  • Nutrition and Dietetics
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

Effect of tocotrienol on lipid peroxidation in experimental gastritis induced by restraint stress. / Mohd Fahami, Nur Azlina; Nafeeza, M. I.

In: Pakistan Journal of Nutrition, Vol. 4, No. 2, 2005, p. 69-72.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{58454aeaa9074b47aed667cd82f50a05,
title = "Effect of tocotrienol on lipid peroxidation in experimental gastritis induced by restraint stress",
abstract = "Damage to gastric mucosa caused by restraint stress has been attributed to impaired blood flow that resulted in ischemia followed by reperfusion, a process that generates free radicals. Therefore oxygen radicals may mediate the lesions produced in restraint stress. To test this hypothesis, we studied the effect of free radical scavengers on restraint-induced lesions in rats. Forty rats were divided in to four groups of 10 rats. Two control groups was fed with a normal rat diet and two treatment groups fed with a vitamin E deficient diet with either tocopherol or tocotrienol, which serves as free radical scavengers. The two forms of vitamin E were administered orally at 60mg/kg body weight for 28 days. After 28 days, rats from one control group and the two treated groups were subjected to restraint stress 2 hours daily for 4 consecutive days. The rats were killed after the fourth exposure, their stomach isolated and examined for lesions, and gastric malondialdehyde (MOA) content and the gastric reduced glutathione level were measured as an index to reflect the scavenging abilities of tocopherol and tocotrienol. Both the regimes significantly attenuated the total lesion area in the stomach compared to the control. The MOA content was also significantly lower in the rats given tocopherol and tocotrienol supplementation compared to the control and the reduced glutathione levels were preserved in rats supplemented with both tocopherol and tocotrienol. We conclude that it is indeed probable that oxygen radical is involved in the pathogenesis of restraint stress-induced lesions thus supplementation with antioxidant such as vitamin E may be able to reduce or inhibit the formation of these lesions.",
keywords = "Gastric lesions, Peroxidation, Restraint-stress, Tocopherol, Tocotrienol",
author = "{Mohd Fahami}, {Nur Azlina} and Nafeeza, {M. I.}",
year = "2005",
doi = "10.3923/pjn.2005.69.72",
language = "English",
volume = "4",
pages = "69--72",
journal = "Pakistan Journal of Nutrition",
issn = "1680-5194",
publisher = "Asian Network for Scientific Information",
number = "2",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Effect of tocotrienol on lipid peroxidation in experimental gastritis induced by restraint stress

AU - Mohd Fahami, Nur Azlina

AU - Nafeeza, M. I.

PY - 2005

Y1 - 2005

N2 - Damage to gastric mucosa caused by restraint stress has been attributed to impaired blood flow that resulted in ischemia followed by reperfusion, a process that generates free radicals. Therefore oxygen radicals may mediate the lesions produced in restraint stress. To test this hypothesis, we studied the effect of free radical scavengers on restraint-induced lesions in rats. Forty rats were divided in to four groups of 10 rats. Two control groups was fed with a normal rat diet and two treatment groups fed with a vitamin E deficient diet with either tocopherol or tocotrienol, which serves as free radical scavengers. The two forms of vitamin E were administered orally at 60mg/kg body weight for 28 days. After 28 days, rats from one control group and the two treated groups were subjected to restraint stress 2 hours daily for 4 consecutive days. The rats were killed after the fourth exposure, their stomach isolated and examined for lesions, and gastric malondialdehyde (MOA) content and the gastric reduced glutathione level were measured as an index to reflect the scavenging abilities of tocopherol and tocotrienol. Both the regimes significantly attenuated the total lesion area in the stomach compared to the control. The MOA content was also significantly lower in the rats given tocopherol and tocotrienol supplementation compared to the control and the reduced glutathione levels were preserved in rats supplemented with both tocopherol and tocotrienol. We conclude that it is indeed probable that oxygen radical is involved in the pathogenesis of restraint stress-induced lesions thus supplementation with antioxidant such as vitamin E may be able to reduce or inhibit the formation of these lesions.

AB - Damage to gastric mucosa caused by restraint stress has been attributed to impaired blood flow that resulted in ischemia followed by reperfusion, a process that generates free radicals. Therefore oxygen radicals may mediate the lesions produced in restraint stress. To test this hypothesis, we studied the effect of free radical scavengers on restraint-induced lesions in rats. Forty rats were divided in to four groups of 10 rats. Two control groups was fed with a normal rat diet and two treatment groups fed with a vitamin E deficient diet with either tocopherol or tocotrienol, which serves as free radical scavengers. The two forms of vitamin E were administered orally at 60mg/kg body weight for 28 days. After 28 days, rats from one control group and the two treated groups were subjected to restraint stress 2 hours daily for 4 consecutive days. The rats were killed after the fourth exposure, their stomach isolated and examined for lesions, and gastric malondialdehyde (MOA) content and the gastric reduced glutathione level were measured as an index to reflect the scavenging abilities of tocopherol and tocotrienol. Both the regimes significantly attenuated the total lesion area in the stomach compared to the control. The MOA content was also significantly lower in the rats given tocopherol and tocotrienol supplementation compared to the control and the reduced glutathione levels were preserved in rats supplemented with both tocopherol and tocotrienol. We conclude that it is indeed probable that oxygen radical is involved in the pathogenesis of restraint stress-induced lesions thus supplementation with antioxidant such as vitamin E may be able to reduce or inhibit the formation of these lesions.

KW - Gastric lesions

KW - Peroxidation

KW - Restraint-stress

KW - Tocopherol

KW - Tocotrienol

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=40249099288&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=40249099288&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.3923/pjn.2005.69.72

DO - 10.3923/pjn.2005.69.72

M3 - Article

AN - SCOPUS:40249099288

VL - 4

SP - 69

EP - 72

JO - Pakistan Journal of Nutrition

JF - Pakistan Journal of Nutrition

SN - 1680-5194

IS - 2

ER -