Effect of sampling on real ocular aberration measurements

Lourdes Llorente, Susana Marcos, Carlos Dorronsoro, Stephen A. Burns

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

16 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The minimum number of samples necessary to fully characterize the aberration pattern of the eye is a question under debate in the clinical as well as the scientific community. We performed repeated measurements of ocular aberrations in 12 healthy nonsurgical human eyes and in 3 artificial eyes, using different sampling patterns (hexagonal, circular, and rectangular with 19 to 177 samples, and 3 radial patterns with 49 sample coordinates corresponding to zeros of the Albrecht, Jacobi, and Legendre functions). For each measurement set we computed two different metrics based on the root-mean-square (RMS) of difference maps (RMS-Dift) and the proportional change in the wavefront (W%). These metrics are used to compare wavefront estimates as well as to summarize results across eyes. We used computer simulations to extend our results to "abnormal eyes" (keratoconic, post-LASIK, and post-radial keratotomy eyes). We found that the spatial distribution of the samples can be more important than the number of samples for both our measured as well as our simulated "abnormal" eyes. Experimentally, we did not find large differences across patterns except, as expected, for undersampled patterns.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)2783-2796
Number of pages14
JournalJournal of the Optical Society of America A: Optics and Image Science, and Vision
Volume24
Issue number9
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2007
Externally publishedYes

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Wavefronts
Aberrations
aberration
sampling
Sampling
Spatial distribution
Computer simulation
Legendre functions
spatial distribution
computerized simulation
estimates

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Electronic, Optical and Magnetic Materials
  • Computer Vision and Pattern Recognition

Cite this

Effect of sampling on real ocular aberration measurements. / Llorente, Lourdes; Marcos, Susana; Dorronsoro, Carlos; Burns, Stephen A.

In: Journal of the Optical Society of America A: Optics and Image Science, and Vision, Vol. 24, No. 9, 2007, p. 2783-2796.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Llorente, Lourdes ; Marcos, Susana ; Dorronsoro, Carlos ; Burns, Stephen A. / Effect of sampling on real ocular aberration measurements. In: Journal of the Optical Society of America A: Optics and Image Science, and Vision. 2007 ; Vol. 24, No. 9. pp. 2783-2796.
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