Effect of heavy metals to bacterial culture and the removal of heavy metals from an industrial effluent

P. Sannasi, S. Salmijah, J. Kader

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    3 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    This paper reports the capability of consortium culture (CC) comprising of an acclimatized mixed bacterial culture to withstand the toxic effect of Cr(VI), Cu, and Pb, at 1, 10, 100 mg/l and its uptake, and to remove heavy metals from an industrial effluent. Consortium culture displayed good heavy metal resistance (75-84.6%) on nutrient agar. Inverse of heavy metal toxicity index, B (l/mg) reflected CC's ability to tolerate Cr(VI) concentration of up to 507.6 mg/l, followed by Pb at 348.43 mg/ l and Cu at 243.90 mg/l. High metal uptake capacity was observed at 1 mg/l (q = 4.47-10.33 mg/g), 10 mg/l (q = 29.27-96.07 mg/g) and 100 mg/ (q = 85.28-175.02 mg/g) in nutrient broth. Overall, metal toxicity was in the order Cu > Pb > Cr(VI), and metal uptake was Pb > Cu > Cr(VI). X-ray fluorescence screening Indicated the abundance of Ca, K, P, and S on the biomass. Heavy metal removal study demonstrated that CC was able to grow in waste effluent which was not subjected to any pre-treatment or nutrient addition. Significantly higher metal removal in the range of 92-97.5% (P < 0.05) was obtained for Cd, Cr(VI), Cu, Ni, and Pb with CC. Furthermore, CC was able to thrive and compete in the presence of indigenous microbial population with no apparent decrease in metal removal capability. In conclusion, results establish the feasibility of employing CC to remove heavy metals from industrial effluents and support the development of a bacterium-based integrated waste treatment system.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)543-557
    Number of pages15
    JournalBiosciences Biotechnology Research Asia
    Volume7
    Issue number2
    Publication statusPublished - Dec 2010

    Fingerprint

    industrial effluents
    Heavy Metals
    heavy metals
    Metals
    metals
    uptake mechanisms
    Food
    nutrients
    toxicity
    waste treatment
    metal tolerance
    Poisons
    Population Groups
    Biomass
    Agar
    effluents
    X-radiation
    pretreatment
    agar
    Fluorescence

    Keywords

    • Consortium culture
    • Industrial effluent
    • Metal removal
    • Metal resistant
    • Metal uptake
    • Waste treatment

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Biotechnology
    • Agronomy and Crop Science
    • Drug Discovery

    Cite this

    Effect of heavy metals to bacterial culture and the removal of heavy metals from an industrial effluent. / Sannasi, P.; Salmijah, S.; Kader, J.

    In: Biosciences Biotechnology Research Asia, Vol. 7, No. 2, 12.2010, p. 543-557.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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