Effect of boron carbide addition on the physical, mechanical and microstructural properties of portland cement concrete

Fatin Nabilah Tajul Ariffin, Yusof Abdullah, Roslinda Shamsudin, Roszilah Hamid, Sahrim Ahmad

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Concrete nuclear reactors could be improved in terms of life safety by adding boron carbide. This study presents an experimental investigation of the physical, mechanical and microstructural properties of Portland cement concrete containing boron carbide (B4C) as a neutron radiation-absorbing material for nuclear reactor applications. The boron carbide powder additions were 5 and 20% of the cement weight. The water-to-cement ratio of the concrete design mix was 0.4. The results show that the concrete density decreased as the percentage of boron carbide content increased. The results also show that concrete with a 0% content of B4C produced the highest compressive strength (32.73 MPa) and that the addition of 5 and 20% B4C produced a negligible reduction of strength (<2% compared with 0% B4C concrete). Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) results confirm that the addition of boron carbide to Portland cement concrete reduces the strength and density of concrete because the morphology of samples containing 5 and 20% B4C by weight (wt.) shows a more porous concrete microstructure compared with the control samples. Energy Dispersive X-ray (EDX) analysis was used to conclude that the higher content of B4C results in a lower percentage of calcium in the concrete which in turn reduces the strength. Up to 20% B4C powder by weight can be added to concrete which produces minimal strength reduction.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)3738-3743
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Applied Sciences
Volume11
Issue number22
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2011

Fingerprint

Boron carbide
Portland cement
Concretes
Nuclear reactors
Cements
Powders
Energy dispersive X ray analysis
Compressive strength
Calcium
Neutrons

Keywords

  • Borom carbide
  • Compressive strength
  • Neutron absorption
  • Nuclear reactor
  • Portland cement

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • General

Cite this

Effect of boron carbide addition on the physical, mechanical and microstructural properties of portland cement concrete. / Ariffin, Fatin Nabilah Tajul; Abdullah, Yusof; Shamsudin, Roslinda; Hamid, Roszilah; Ahmad, Sahrim.

In: Journal of Applied Sciences, Vol. 11, No. 22, 2011, p. 3738-3743.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{a086a84c7bfb4708be59066251ecf860,
title = "Effect of boron carbide addition on the physical, mechanical and microstructural properties of portland cement concrete",
abstract = "Concrete nuclear reactors could be improved in terms of life safety by adding boron carbide. This study presents an experimental investigation of the physical, mechanical and microstructural properties of Portland cement concrete containing boron carbide (B4C) as a neutron radiation-absorbing material for nuclear reactor applications. The boron carbide powder additions were 5 and 20{\%} of the cement weight. The water-to-cement ratio of the concrete design mix was 0.4. The results show that the concrete density decreased as the percentage of boron carbide content increased. The results also show that concrete with a 0{\%} content of B4C produced the highest compressive strength (32.73 MPa) and that the addition of 5 and 20{\%} B4C produced a negligible reduction of strength (<2{\%} compared with 0{\%} B4C concrete). Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) results confirm that the addition of boron carbide to Portland cement concrete reduces the strength and density of concrete because the morphology of samples containing 5 and 20{\%} B4C by weight (wt.) shows a more porous concrete microstructure compared with the control samples. Energy Dispersive X-ray (EDX) analysis was used to conclude that the higher content of B4C results in a lower percentage of calcium in the concrete which in turn reduces the strength. Up to 20{\%} B4C powder by weight can be added to concrete which produces minimal strength reduction.",
keywords = "Borom carbide, Compressive strength, Neutron absorption, Nuclear reactor, Portland cement",
author = "Ariffin, {Fatin Nabilah Tajul} and Yusof Abdullah and Roslinda Shamsudin and Roszilah Hamid and Sahrim Ahmad",
year = "2011",
doi = "10.3923/jas.2011.3738.3743",
language = "English",
volume = "11",
pages = "3738--3743",
journal = "Journal of Applied Sciences",
issn = "1812-5654",
publisher = "Asian Network for Scientific Information",
number = "22",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Effect of boron carbide addition on the physical, mechanical and microstructural properties of portland cement concrete

AU - Ariffin, Fatin Nabilah Tajul

AU - Abdullah, Yusof

AU - Shamsudin, Roslinda

AU - Hamid, Roszilah

AU - Ahmad, Sahrim

PY - 2011

Y1 - 2011

N2 - Concrete nuclear reactors could be improved in terms of life safety by adding boron carbide. This study presents an experimental investigation of the physical, mechanical and microstructural properties of Portland cement concrete containing boron carbide (B4C) as a neutron radiation-absorbing material for nuclear reactor applications. The boron carbide powder additions were 5 and 20% of the cement weight. The water-to-cement ratio of the concrete design mix was 0.4. The results show that the concrete density decreased as the percentage of boron carbide content increased. The results also show that concrete with a 0% content of B4C produced the highest compressive strength (32.73 MPa) and that the addition of 5 and 20% B4C produced a negligible reduction of strength (<2% compared with 0% B4C concrete). Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) results confirm that the addition of boron carbide to Portland cement concrete reduces the strength and density of concrete because the morphology of samples containing 5 and 20% B4C by weight (wt.) shows a more porous concrete microstructure compared with the control samples. Energy Dispersive X-ray (EDX) analysis was used to conclude that the higher content of B4C results in a lower percentage of calcium in the concrete which in turn reduces the strength. Up to 20% B4C powder by weight can be added to concrete which produces minimal strength reduction.

AB - Concrete nuclear reactors could be improved in terms of life safety by adding boron carbide. This study presents an experimental investigation of the physical, mechanical and microstructural properties of Portland cement concrete containing boron carbide (B4C) as a neutron radiation-absorbing material for nuclear reactor applications. The boron carbide powder additions were 5 and 20% of the cement weight. The water-to-cement ratio of the concrete design mix was 0.4. The results show that the concrete density decreased as the percentage of boron carbide content increased. The results also show that concrete with a 0% content of B4C produced the highest compressive strength (32.73 MPa) and that the addition of 5 and 20% B4C produced a negligible reduction of strength (<2% compared with 0% B4C concrete). Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) results confirm that the addition of boron carbide to Portland cement concrete reduces the strength and density of concrete because the morphology of samples containing 5 and 20% B4C by weight (wt.) shows a more porous concrete microstructure compared with the control samples. Energy Dispersive X-ray (EDX) analysis was used to conclude that the higher content of B4C results in a lower percentage of calcium in the concrete which in turn reduces the strength. Up to 20% B4C powder by weight can be added to concrete which produces minimal strength reduction.

KW - Borom carbide

KW - Compressive strength

KW - Neutron absorption

KW - Nuclear reactor

KW - Portland cement

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84555187486&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84555187486&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.3923/jas.2011.3738.3743

DO - 10.3923/jas.2011.3738.3743

M3 - Article

AN - SCOPUS:84555187486

VL - 11

SP - 3738

EP - 3743

JO - Journal of Applied Sciences

JF - Journal of Applied Sciences

SN - 1812-5654

IS - 22

ER -