Effect of antibiotic, Lacto-lase® and probiotic addition in chicken feed on protein and fat content of chicken meat

Noor Amiza Azhar, Aminah Abdullah

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

This research was conducted to investigate the effect of chicken feed additives (antibiotic, Lacto-lase® and probiotic) on protein and fat content of chicken meat. Chicken fed with control diet (corn-soy based diet) served as a control. The treated diets were added with zinc bacitracin (antibiotic), different amount of Lacto-lase® (a mixture of probiotic and enzyme) and probiotic. Chicken were slaughtered at the age of 43-48 days. Each chicken was divided into thigh, breast, drumstick, drumette and wing. Protein content in chicken meat was determined by using macro-Kjeldahl method meanwhile Soxhlet method was used to analyse fat content. The result of the study showed that the protein content of chicken breast was significantly higher (p≤0.05) while thigh had the lowest protein content (p≤0.05). Antibiotic fed chicken was found to have the highest protein content among the treated chickens but there was no significant different with 2g/kg Lacto-lase® fed chicken (p>0.05). All thighs were significantly higher (p≤0.05) in fat content except for drumette of control chicken while breast contained the lowest fat content compared to other chicken parts studied. The control chicken meat contained significantly higher (p≤0.05) amount of fat compared to the other treated chickens. Chicken fed with 2g/kg Lacto-lase® had the lowest (p≤0.05) fat content. The result of this study indicated that the addition of Lacto-lase® as a replacement of antibiotic in chicken feed will not affect the content of protein and fat of chicken meat.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publication2015 UKM FST Postgraduate Colloquium: Proceedings of the Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, Faculty of Science and Technology 2015 Postgraduate Colloquium
PublisherAmerican Institute of Physics Inc.
Volume1678
ISBN (Electronic)9780735413252
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 25 Sep 2015
Event2015 Postgraduate Colloquium of the Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, Faculty of Science and Technology, UKM FST 2015 - Selangor, Malaysia
Duration: 15 Apr 201516 Apr 2015

Other

Other2015 Postgraduate Colloquium of the Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, Faculty of Science and Technology, UKM FST 2015
CountryMalaysia
CitySelangor
Period15/4/1516/4/15

Fingerprint

chickens
antibiotics
fats
proteins
thigh
diets
breast
Kjeldahl method
corn

Keywords

  • antibiotic
  • chicken meat
  • fat
  • Lacto-lase®
  • probiotic
  • protein

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physics and Astronomy(all)

Cite this

Azhar, N. A., & Abdullah, A. (2015). Effect of antibiotic, Lacto-lase® and probiotic addition in chicken feed on protein and fat content of chicken meat. In 2015 UKM FST Postgraduate Colloquium: Proceedings of the Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, Faculty of Science and Technology 2015 Postgraduate Colloquium (Vol. 1678). [050040] American Institute of Physics Inc.. https://doi.org/10.1063/1.4931319

Effect of antibiotic, Lacto-lase® and probiotic addition in chicken feed on protein and fat content of chicken meat. / Azhar, Noor Amiza; Abdullah, Aminah.

2015 UKM FST Postgraduate Colloquium: Proceedings of the Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, Faculty of Science and Technology 2015 Postgraduate Colloquium. Vol. 1678 American Institute of Physics Inc., 2015. 050040.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Azhar, NA & Abdullah, A 2015, Effect of antibiotic, Lacto-lase® and probiotic addition in chicken feed on protein and fat content of chicken meat. in 2015 UKM FST Postgraduate Colloquium: Proceedings of the Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, Faculty of Science and Technology 2015 Postgraduate Colloquium. vol. 1678, 050040, American Institute of Physics Inc., 2015 Postgraduate Colloquium of the Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, Faculty of Science and Technology, UKM FST 2015, Selangor, Malaysia, 15/4/15. https://doi.org/10.1063/1.4931319
Azhar NA, Abdullah A. Effect of antibiotic, Lacto-lase® and probiotic addition in chicken feed on protein and fat content of chicken meat. In 2015 UKM FST Postgraduate Colloquium: Proceedings of the Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, Faculty of Science and Technology 2015 Postgraduate Colloquium. Vol. 1678. American Institute of Physics Inc. 2015. 050040 https://doi.org/10.1063/1.4931319
Azhar, Noor Amiza ; Abdullah, Aminah. / Effect of antibiotic, Lacto-lase® and probiotic addition in chicken feed on protein and fat content of chicken meat. 2015 UKM FST Postgraduate Colloquium: Proceedings of the Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, Faculty of Science and Technology 2015 Postgraduate Colloquium. Vol. 1678 American Institute of Physics Inc., 2015.
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