Educational performance of pediatric cochlear implant recipients in mainstream classes

Siti Zamratol Mai Sarah Mukari, Lai N. Ling, Hanizam A. Ghani

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

31 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objectives: The present study documents the school performance of 20 pediatric cochlear implant recipients who attended mainstream classes and compares their educational performance with their normally hearing peers. Methodology: All 20 school-aged children who underwent cochlear implantation at the Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia cochlear implant programme participated in this study. Three measures were employed to assess the school performance. First, using the SIFTER teacher-rating scale, the second measure was the child's examination results, and the third was the child's standing compared to his/her peers in language subject, mathematics, and the overall academic performance during the end of semester examinations. Results: The SIFTER rating scale indicated that only 11.8% of the children were identified as not educationally at risk, 17.6% passed four of the SIFTER subtests, whereas the other 71.6% failed in at least two of the subtests on SIFTER. The highest pass rate was obtained in behavior subtest (76.5%), followed by classroom participation (70.6%), attention (58.8%), academic (47.1%), and communication (11.8%). On the educational performance, the cochlear implant recipients performed significantly better in mathematics (mean scores 62.67%; S.D. 22.24) than in language (mean scores 49.96%, S.D. 25.88) (p < 0.01). In the overall examination performance, 25.00% had above average performance (>75th percentile), 18.75% had average performance (25-75th percentile), and another 56.25% performed at below average (<25th percentile). Conclusion: Children with cochlear implant were rated poorly in the SIFTER communication subtest. It is possible that language deficit presents an educational challenge in these children. The educational performance of children with cochlear implants in mainstream classes varies. Although 43.75% of them thrive well in a full-time mainstream setting, a significant percentage of them (56.25%) performed at below the average level. These findings reemphasize that although a cochlear implant has successfully provided deaf children with a good hearing potential, the majority of its recipients still require additional educational supports in order to function well in the mainstream educational setting.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)231-240
Number of pages10
JournalInternational Journal of Pediatric Otorhinolaryngology
Volume71
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Feb 2007

Fingerprint

Cochlear Implants
Pediatrics
Language
Mathematics
Hearing
Communication
Cochlear Implantation
Malaysia

Keywords

  • Academic performance
  • Children with cochlear implants
  • Mainstream classes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Otorhinolaryngology
  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Pulmonary and Respiratory Medicine
  • Surgery

Cite this

Educational performance of pediatric cochlear implant recipients in mainstream classes. / Mukari, Siti Zamratol Mai Sarah; Ling, Lai N.; Ghani, Hanizam A.

In: International Journal of Pediatric Otorhinolaryngology, Vol. 71, No. 2, 02.2007, p. 231-240.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Mukari, Siti Zamratol Mai Sarah ; Ling, Lai N. ; Ghani, Hanizam A. / Educational performance of pediatric cochlear implant recipients in mainstream classes. In: International Journal of Pediatric Otorhinolaryngology. 2007 ; Vol. 71, No. 2. pp. 231-240.
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