Ecotourism

Precepts and critical success factors

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Ecotourism has evolved over the past three decades to emerge as lucrative sector. The main worrying aspect of this growth is that its original precepts of responsible travel, environmental conservation and the enfranchisement of local populations is steadily giving way to predatory economic exploitation, 'green-washing' (superficial environmental management) and the marginalisation of local communities. Given that responsible ecotourism must be done right, this article identifies the critical success factors for the making of healthy ecotourism in Malaysia and compares them with the achievements made in other selected countries. The results showed that three general precepts and critical success factors may be summed up from this particular Malaysian experience. Firstly, ecological integrity of the tourism area that goes beyond green-washing and contributes to minimising the carbon footprint. Secondly, social vitality where local communities are involved not just in the environmental conservation and management of the tourism area but also as direct economic beneficiaries of the tourism enterprise. Finally, economic growth where private and public sectors' participation inputs sophistry and enhancement of the marketing linkages without marginalising local communities. This implies that for tourism to progress responsibly and meaningfully, all stakeholders-the environmentalists, the local communities, the entrepreneurs and the government-need to get their acts together in coordinating and fine-tuning their different but complimentary roles.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)110-113
Number of pages4
JournalWorld Applied Sciences Journal
Volume13
Issue number13
Publication statusPublished - 2011

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ecotourism
tourism
environmental management
carbon footprint
marginalization
entrepreneur
public sector
economics
private sector
marketing
economic growth
stakeholder
environmental conservation

Keywords

  • Distribution linkages
  • Ecotourism
  • Environmental conservation
  • Local communities' participation
  • Precepts

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • General

Cite this

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title = "Ecotourism: Precepts and critical success factors",
abstract = "Ecotourism has evolved over the past three decades to emerge as lucrative sector. The main worrying aspect of this growth is that its original precepts of responsible travel, environmental conservation and the enfranchisement of local populations is steadily giving way to predatory economic exploitation, 'green-washing' (superficial environmental management) and the marginalisation of local communities. Given that responsible ecotourism must be done right, this article identifies the critical success factors for the making of healthy ecotourism in Malaysia and compares them with the achievements made in other selected countries. The results showed that three general precepts and critical success factors may be summed up from this particular Malaysian experience. Firstly, ecological integrity of the tourism area that goes beyond green-washing and contributes to minimising the carbon footprint. Secondly, social vitality where local communities are involved not just in the environmental conservation and management of the tourism area but also as direct economic beneficiaries of the tourism enterprise. Finally, economic growth where private and public sectors' participation inputs sophistry and enhancement of the marketing linkages without marginalising local communities. This implies that for tourism to progress responsibly and meaningfully, all stakeholders-the environmentalists, the local communities, the entrepreneurs and the government-need to get their acts together in coordinating and fine-tuning their different but complimentary roles.",
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