Economic globalisation and change: Implications on geographical education in Malaysia

Katiman Rostam

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    3 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    The process of globalisation has had an impact on world economic activities, particularly in the service sector. Service activity, education in particular, has long been regarded as a social rather than a commercial function. However, following the global shift in economic activities during the 1990s from manufacturing to services, education emerged as an important component of producer services. Universities, research and technical training institutions have played pivotal roles in the new economy by supplying new ideas, technical innovations, industrial patents and, most importantly, human resource. Currently, universities have to be more competitive globally. The new production and service economies, which are mainly located in the metropolitan areas, require university graduates to be equipped with more new skills. The marketability of a graduate is no longer based on academic performance alone. Human-centred generic skills such as communication, ethics, teamwork and leadership together with other advanced technical skills have become much more critical in determining how employable university graduates are. Such a shift has compelled universities to make the necessary adjustments to their curriculum across disciplines by incorporating new knowledge and skills in their learning activities. This paper discusses how universities react to the global economic shift with regard to growing demand for new skills among their graduates with special reference to geography. By virtue of the fact that geography is not clearly a technically oriented subject, students of the discipline have to strike a balance between acquiring new knowledge and mastering generic skills as a new strategy to cope with the problem of unemployable graduates.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)533-543
    Number of pages11
    JournalEuropean Journal of Social Sciences
    Volume9
    Issue number4
    Publication statusPublished - Oct 2009

    Fingerprint

    Malaysia
    globalization
    graduate
    economics
    university
    education
    communication ethics
    geography
    technical training
    university research
    new economy
    teamwork
    technical innovation
    tertiary sector
    human resources
    patent
    knowledge
    agglomeration area
    producer
    manufacturing

    Keywords

    • Economic globalisation
    • Geographical ecucation
    • Metropolitan growth
    • Producer services
    • Service economic activity

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Social Sciences(all)

    Cite this

    Economic globalisation and change : Implications on geographical education in Malaysia. / Rostam, Katiman.

    In: European Journal of Social Sciences, Vol. 9, No. 4, 10.2009, p. 533-543.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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