Eating behaviour predicts weight loss six months after bariatric surgery

A longitudinal study

Kavitha Subramaniam, Wah Yun Low, Peng Choong Lau, Kin Fah Chin, Karuthan Chinna, Nik Ritza Kosai Nik Mahmood, Mustafa Mohammed Taher, Reynu Rajan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Bariatric surgery is currently the most durable weight loss solution for patients with morbid obesity. The extent of weight loss achieved, however, is subject to variation due to various factors, including patients’ behaviour. In this study, we aimed to identify pre-and post-surgical predictors of weight loss following bariatric surgery. This prospective study included 57 participants who went through bariatric surgery (laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass: n = 30; laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy: n = 23; one anastomosis gastric bypass-mini gastric bypass: n = 4) in two tertiary referral hospitals. Consenting participants were assessed prior to surgery (T0 ), and three months (T1 ) and six months (T2 ) after surgery. The assessment included interview and anthropometric measurements. The interview was done with the aid of instruments, including the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) for anxiety and depression screening and the Dutch Eating Behaviour Questionnaire (DEBQ) for eating behaviour assessment. Baseline comorbidity status was obtained from medical records. A Generalised Estimating Equation (GEE) was developed to determine predictors of weight loss. Participants in the study were mostly women (n = 37, 65%) with a mean age of 39.4 (SD = 10.01) years. The mean excess BMI loss (EBMIL) and total weight loss (TWL) at the sixth month was 63.31% and 23.83%, respectively. Anxiety, depression, and external eating scores reduced over time. Advancing age, high BMI, and higher scores for emotional and external eating emerged as significant negative predictors for TWL%. It can be concluded that the patients experienced substantial weight loss after surgery. Continuous monitoring of psychological well-being and eating behaviour are essential for optimal weight loss.

Original languageEnglish
Article number1616
JournalNutrients
Volume10
Issue number11
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2 Nov 2018

Fingerprint

bariatric surgery
Bariatric Surgery
Feeding Behavior
longitudinal studies
eating habits
Longitudinal Studies
Weight Loss
weight loss
Gastric Bypass
anxiety
Anxiety
surgery
Depression
interviews
Eating
ingestion
Interviews
Morbid Obesity
Gastrectomy
anthropometric measurements

Keywords

  • Bariatric surgery
  • Eating behaviour
  • Obesity
  • Psychology
  • Weight loss

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Food Science
  • Nutrition and Dietetics

Cite this

Subramaniam, K., Low, W. Y., Lau, P. C., Chin, K. F., Chinna, K., Nik Mahmood, N. R. K., ... Rajan, R. (2018). Eating behaviour predicts weight loss six months after bariatric surgery: A longitudinal study. Nutrients, 10(11), [1616]. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu10111616

Eating behaviour predicts weight loss six months after bariatric surgery : A longitudinal study. / Subramaniam, Kavitha; Low, Wah Yun; Lau, Peng Choong; Chin, Kin Fah; Chinna, Karuthan; Nik Mahmood, Nik Ritza Kosai; Taher, Mustafa Mohammed; Rajan, Reynu.

In: Nutrients, Vol. 10, No. 11, 1616, 02.11.2018.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Subramaniam, K, Low, WY, Lau, PC, Chin, KF, Chinna, K, Nik Mahmood, NRK, Taher, MM & Rajan, R 2018, 'Eating behaviour predicts weight loss six months after bariatric surgery: A longitudinal study', Nutrients, vol. 10, no. 11, 1616. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu10111616
Subramaniam, Kavitha ; Low, Wah Yun ; Lau, Peng Choong ; Chin, Kin Fah ; Chinna, Karuthan ; Nik Mahmood, Nik Ritza Kosai ; Taher, Mustafa Mohammed ; Rajan, Reynu. / Eating behaviour predicts weight loss six months after bariatric surgery : A longitudinal study. In: Nutrients. 2018 ; Vol. 10, No. 11.
@article{b0968168b9f747f09ba349c495b90bee,
title = "Eating behaviour predicts weight loss six months after bariatric surgery: A longitudinal study",
abstract = "Bariatric surgery is currently the most durable weight loss solution for patients with morbid obesity. The extent of weight loss achieved, however, is subject to variation due to various factors, including patients’ behaviour. In this study, we aimed to identify pre-and post-surgical predictors of weight loss following bariatric surgery. This prospective study included 57 participants who went through bariatric surgery (laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass: n = 30; laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy: n = 23; one anastomosis gastric bypass-mini gastric bypass: n = 4) in two tertiary referral hospitals. Consenting participants were assessed prior to surgery (T0 ), and three months (T1 ) and six months (T2 ) after surgery. The assessment included interview and anthropometric measurements. The interview was done with the aid of instruments, including the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) for anxiety and depression screening and the Dutch Eating Behaviour Questionnaire (DEBQ) for eating behaviour assessment. Baseline comorbidity status was obtained from medical records. A Generalised Estimating Equation (GEE) was developed to determine predictors of weight loss. Participants in the study were mostly women (n = 37, 65{\%}) with a mean age of 39.4 (SD = 10.01) years. The mean excess BMI loss (EBMIL) and total weight loss (TWL) at the sixth month was 63.31{\%} and 23.83{\%}, respectively. Anxiety, depression, and external eating scores reduced over time. Advancing age, high BMI, and higher scores for emotional and external eating emerged as significant negative predictors for TWL{\%}. It can be concluded that the patients experienced substantial weight loss after surgery. Continuous monitoring of psychological well-being and eating behaviour are essential for optimal weight loss.",
keywords = "Bariatric surgery, Eating behaviour, Obesity, Psychology, Weight loss",
author = "Kavitha Subramaniam and Low, {Wah Yun} and Lau, {Peng Choong} and Chin, {Kin Fah} and Karuthan Chinna and {Nik Mahmood}, {Nik Ritza Kosai} and Taher, {Mustafa Mohammed} and Reynu Rajan",
year = "2018",
month = "11",
day = "2",
doi = "10.3390/nu10111616",
language = "English",
volume = "10",
journal = "Nutrients",
issn = "2072-6643",
publisher = "Multidisciplinary Digital Publishing Institute (MDPI)",
number = "11",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Eating behaviour predicts weight loss six months after bariatric surgery

T2 - A longitudinal study

AU - Subramaniam, Kavitha

AU - Low, Wah Yun

AU - Lau, Peng Choong

AU - Chin, Kin Fah

AU - Chinna, Karuthan

AU - Nik Mahmood, Nik Ritza Kosai

AU - Taher, Mustafa Mohammed

AU - Rajan, Reynu

PY - 2018/11/2

Y1 - 2018/11/2

N2 - Bariatric surgery is currently the most durable weight loss solution for patients with morbid obesity. The extent of weight loss achieved, however, is subject to variation due to various factors, including patients’ behaviour. In this study, we aimed to identify pre-and post-surgical predictors of weight loss following bariatric surgery. This prospective study included 57 participants who went through bariatric surgery (laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass: n = 30; laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy: n = 23; one anastomosis gastric bypass-mini gastric bypass: n = 4) in two tertiary referral hospitals. Consenting participants were assessed prior to surgery (T0 ), and three months (T1 ) and six months (T2 ) after surgery. The assessment included interview and anthropometric measurements. The interview was done with the aid of instruments, including the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) for anxiety and depression screening and the Dutch Eating Behaviour Questionnaire (DEBQ) for eating behaviour assessment. Baseline comorbidity status was obtained from medical records. A Generalised Estimating Equation (GEE) was developed to determine predictors of weight loss. Participants in the study were mostly women (n = 37, 65%) with a mean age of 39.4 (SD = 10.01) years. The mean excess BMI loss (EBMIL) and total weight loss (TWL) at the sixth month was 63.31% and 23.83%, respectively. Anxiety, depression, and external eating scores reduced over time. Advancing age, high BMI, and higher scores for emotional and external eating emerged as significant negative predictors for TWL%. It can be concluded that the patients experienced substantial weight loss after surgery. Continuous monitoring of psychological well-being and eating behaviour are essential for optimal weight loss.

AB - Bariatric surgery is currently the most durable weight loss solution for patients with morbid obesity. The extent of weight loss achieved, however, is subject to variation due to various factors, including patients’ behaviour. In this study, we aimed to identify pre-and post-surgical predictors of weight loss following bariatric surgery. This prospective study included 57 participants who went through bariatric surgery (laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass: n = 30; laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy: n = 23; one anastomosis gastric bypass-mini gastric bypass: n = 4) in two tertiary referral hospitals. Consenting participants were assessed prior to surgery (T0 ), and three months (T1 ) and six months (T2 ) after surgery. The assessment included interview and anthropometric measurements. The interview was done with the aid of instruments, including the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) for anxiety and depression screening and the Dutch Eating Behaviour Questionnaire (DEBQ) for eating behaviour assessment. Baseline comorbidity status was obtained from medical records. A Generalised Estimating Equation (GEE) was developed to determine predictors of weight loss. Participants in the study were mostly women (n = 37, 65%) with a mean age of 39.4 (SD = 10.01) years. The mean excess BMI loss (EBMIL) and total weight loss (TWL) at the sixth month was 63.31% and 23.83%, respectively. Anxiety, depression, and external eating scores reduced over time. Advancing age, high BMI, and higher scores for emotional and external eating emerged as significant negative predictors for TWL%. It can be concluded that the patients experienced substantial weight loss after surgery. Continuous monitoring of psychological well-being and eating behaviour are essential for optimal weight loss.

KW - Bariatric surgery

KW - Eating behaviour

KW - Obesity

KW - Psychology

KW - Weight loss

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85056107317&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85056107317&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.3390/nu10111616

DO - 10.3390/nu10111616

M3 - Article

VL - 10

JO - Nutrients

JF - Nutrients

SN - 2072-6643

IS - 11

M1 - 1616

ER -