Early experience with a low FODMAP diet in Asian patients with irritable bowel syndrome

Zhiqin Wong, Chu Zhen Mok, Hazreen Abdul Majid, Sanjiv Mahadeva

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: The efficacy and acceptance of a low fermentable oligosaccharides, disaccharides, monosaccharides and polyols (FODMAP) diet in Asian adults with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) remain uncertain. We aimed to describe our early experience in a single center with a dedicated gastroenterology dietetic service. Methods: Consecutive patients with IBS referred to our dedicated Dietetic Gastroenterology Clinic between February 2016 and May 2016 were screened. A low FODMAP diet was instituted as per standard protocol. Data on demographic and clinical variables were obtained from patients’ records and prospective telephone interviews. Results: A total of 16 patients, with a median age of 67 ± 13.57 years; female gender n = 10 (62.5%); ethnicity: Chinese n = 8 (50%), Indian n = 5 (31.25%), and Malay n = 3 (18.75%) with IBS, were included in the study. Compliance with the low FODMAP diet was complete in 8 of 16 (50%) patients, partial in 4 of 16 (25%), and 4 of 16 (25%) could not comply with the diet at all. Improvement in symptoms were reported in 11 of 16 (68.8%) patients. Among patients who complied (complete/partial) with the low FODMAP diet, predominant symptom improvement was reported as follows: abdominal pain 3 of 5 (60%), abdominal bloating/distension 7 of 10 (70%), and flatulence 7 of 8 (87.5%). Patients with the IBS-D subtype appeared to have the greatest improvement in stool consistency (87.5% IBS-D vs 12.5% non-IBS-D, P = 0.009). Conclusion: Based on our pilot observational study of a relatively small sample of Asian IBS patients, compliance with a low FODMAP diet appears to be low. Further larger studies are required to verify our observation.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)178-181
Number of pages4
JournalJGH Open
Volume2
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Oct 2018

Fingerprint

Monosaccharides
Irritable Bowel Syndrome
Disaccharides
Oligosaccharides
Diet
Dietetics
Gastroenterology
Flatulence
Patient Compliance
polyol
Abdominal Pain
Observational Studies
Observation
Demography
Interviews

Keywords

  • Asia
  • early experience
  • irritable bowel syndrome
  • low fermentable oligosaccharides, disaccharides, monosaccharides and polyols diet
  • treatment

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Gastroenterology
  • Hepatology

Cite this

Early experience with a low FODMAP diet in Asian patients with irritable bowel syndrome. / Wong, Zhiqin; Mok, Chu Zhen; Majid, Hazreen Abdul; Mahadeva, Sanjiv.

In: JGH Open, Vol. 2, No. 5, 01.10.2018, p. 178-181.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Wong, Zhiqin ; Mok, Chu Zhen ; Majid, Hazreen Abdul ; Mahadeva, Sanjiv. / Early experience with a low FODMAP diet in Asian patients with irritable bowel syndrome. In: JGH Open. 2018 ; Vol. 2, No. 5. pp. 178-181.
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abstract = "Background: The efficacy and acceptance of a low fermentable oligosaccharides, disaccharides, monosaccharides and polyols (FODMAP) diet in Asian adults with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) remain uncertain. We aimed to describe our early experience in a single center with a dedicated gastroenterology dietetic service. Methods: Consecutive patients with IBS referred to our dedicated Dietetic Gastroenterology Clinic between February 2016 and May 2016 were screened. A low FODMAP diet was instituted as per standard protocol. Data on demographic and clinical variables were obtained from patients’ records and prospective telephone interviews. Results: A total of 16 patients, with a median age of 67 ± 13.57 years; female gender n = 10 (62.5{\%}); ethnicity: Chinese n = 8 (50{\%}), Indian n = 5 (31.25{\%}), and Malay n = 3 (18.75{\%}) with IBS, were included in the study. Compliance with the low FODMAP diet was complete in 8 of 16 (50{\%}) patients, partial in 4 of 16 (25{\%}), and 4 of 16 (25{\%}) could not comply with the diet at all. Improvement in symptoms were reported in 11 of 16 (68.8{\%}) patients. Among patients who complied (complete/partial) with the low FODMAP diet, predominant symptom improvement was reported as follows: abdominal pain 3 of 5 (60{\%}), abdominal bloating/distension 7 of 10 (70{\%}), and flatulence 7 of 8 (87.5{\%}). Patients with the IBS-D subtype appeared to have the greatest improvement in stool consistency (87.5{\%} IBS-D vs 12.5{\%} non-IBS-D, P = 0.009). Conclusion: Based on our pilot observational study of a relatively small sample of Asian IBS patients, compliance with a low FODMAP diet appears to be low. Further larger studies are required to verify our observation.",
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