Dysphagia training for speech-language pathologists: Implications for clinical practice

Rahayu Mustaffa Kamal, Elizabeth Ward, Petrea Cornwell

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

There are competency standards available in countries with established speech-language pathology services to guide basic dysphagia training with ongoing workplace mentoring for advanced skills development. Such training processes, however, are not as well established in countries where speech-language pathology training and practice is relatively new, such as Malaysia. The current study examines the extent of dysphagia training and workplace support available to speech-language pathologists (SLPs) in Malaysia and Queensland, Australia, and explores clinicians' perceptions of the training and support provided, and of their knowledge, skills, and confidence. Using a matched cohort cross-sectional design, a purpose-built survey was administered to 30 SLPs working in Malaysian government hospitals and 30 SLPs working in Queensland Health settings in Australia. Malaysian clinicians were found to have received significantly less university training, less mentoring in the workplace, and were lacking key infrastructure needed to support professional development in dysphagia management. Over 90% of Queensland clinicians were confident and felt they had adequate skills in dysphagia management; in contrast, significantly lower levels of knowledge, skills, and confidence were observed in the Malaysian cohort. The findings identify a need for improved university training and increased opportunities for workplace mentoring, training, and support for Malaysian SLPs.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)569-576
Number of pages8
JournalInternational Journal of Speech-Language Pathology
Volume14
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Dec 2012

Fingerprint

Language Therapy
Deglutition Disorders
Training Support
Workplace
Queensland
Language
Speech-Language Pathology
Malaysia
Pathologists
Clinical Practice
Speech-language Pathologists
Dysphagia
Health
Mentoring
Work Place

Keywords

  • Dysphagia management
  • skill
  • speech-language pathologist
  • training
  • workplace support

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Otorhinolaryngology
  • LPN and LVN
  • Speech and Hearing
  • Research and Theory
  • Language and Linguistics

Cite this

Dysphagia training for speech-language pathologists : Implications for clinical practice. / Mustaffa Kamal, Rahayu; Ward, Elizabeth; Cornwell, Petrea.

In: International Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, Vol. 14, No. 6, 12.2012, p. 569-576.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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