Dynamics of Trade in Value-Added in “Factory Asia”

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Trade patterns in East Asia are termed the “Factory Asia” model, whereby Asia functions as a “global factory” that imports intermediate goods from its regional networks and then assembles and exports them as finished goods to higher-income developed countries. In 2001, China’s accession into the World Trade Organisation consolidated this pattern by becoming the core economy in this model. However, is this pattern still valid after more than a decade of rapid development in East Asian countries? The main objective of this article is to examine the evolution of this pattern of trade in East Asian countries. Although the key findings of this study show that the Factory Asia model continues, it is changing as different East Asian countries capture more value in global value chains. The gaps in the rate of upgrading are identified and mainly attributed to differences in government policies and competition. However, the dependence on foreign inputs still remains an important part of high-technology production in East Asian countries. Hence, the idea that East Asia is evolving from a “factory” into a “Research & Development hub” remains far-fetched.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1-24
Number of pages24
JournalJournal of Contemporary Asia
DOIs
Publication statusAccepted/In press - 1 Jun 2017

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factory
value added
high technology
value chain
WTO
government policy
import
income
China
economy
Values

Keywords

  • China
  • Global value chain
  • Northeast Asia
  • Southeast Asia
  • trade in value added

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cultural Studies
  • Social Sciences (miscellaneous)

Cite this

Dynamics of Trade in Value-Added in “Factory Asia”. / Rew, Kam Jia Yi.

In: Journal of Contemporary Asia, 01.06.2017, p. 1-24.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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