Dual effects of plant antioxidants on neuron cell viability

S. O. Norfaizatul, C. Z. Zetty Akmal, A. K. Noralisa, S. M. Then, W. N. Wan Zunnah, M. Musalmah

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    5 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    Background: Many studies have focused on oxidative stress induced damage and hence, the protective effects conferred by antioxidants. An example is neurodegenerative diseases which is thought to occur due to neuronal loss associated with oxidative stress. However, some antioxidants such as vitamin E have been shown to also exert pro-oxidative effects at high concentration. Objective: In this study the cytotoxicity and neuroprotective potentials of Chlorella vulgaris (CV), Momordica charantia (MC) and Piper betle (PB) were investigated and correlated with the antioxidant potential. Tocotrienol Rich Fraction (TRF) served as positive control since it had been shown previously to have high antioxidant potential as well as to exert neuroprotective and neurocytotoxic effects. Method: Free radical scavenging activities of hot water extract of CV, aqueous extract of MC, aqueous extract of PB and TRF were determined by using DPPH (1, 1-diphenyl-2-picryl-hydrazyl) assay. Cytotoxicity and neuroprotective effects were measured by using 3 - (4, 5 - dimethylthiazol-2-yl) -5-(3-carboxymethoxyphenyl)-2-(4-sulfophenyl)-2H- tetrazolium salt (MTS) against BSO-induced neuron cell death. Results: Results showed that TRF has the highest radical scavenging activity followed PB> MC> CV. The MTS results showed that TRF (1-50 μg/ml) as positive control, PB (0.001-10(μg/ml) and MC (1-50μg/ml) conferred significant protection against BSO-induced cell death. These plants were cytotoxic at high concentrations. However CV extract did not show significant neuroprotective effect against BSO-induced cell death nor cytotoxic effect. Conclusion: The present findings showed that plant extracts with the higher free radical scavenging activity showed neuroprotective effects at low concentrations but were cytotoxic at higher concentrations.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)113-123
    Number of pages11
    JournalJournal of Medicinal Plants
    Volume9
    Issue numberSUPPL 6.
    Publication statusPublished - Mar 2010

    Fingerprint

    Piper betle
    Momordica charantia
    Chlorella vulgaris
    Tocotrienols
    Neuroprotective Agents
    Cell Survival
    Antioxidants
    Neurons
    Cell Death
    Free Radicals
    Oxidative Stress
    Tetrazolium Salts
    Plant Extracts
    Vitamin E
    Neurodegenerative Diseases
    Water

    Keywords

    • Antioxidant
    • Centella asiatica
    • Chlorella vulgaris
    • Momordica charantia
    • Neuroprotection
    • Piper betle

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Pharmacology
    • Complementary and alternative medicine

    Cite this

    Norfaizatul, S. O., Zetty Akmal, C. Z., Noralisa, A. K., Then, S. M., Wan Zunnah, W. N., & Musalmah, M. (2010). Dual effects of plant antioxidants on neuron cell viability. Journal of Medicinal Plants, 9(SUPPL 6.), 113-123.

    Dual effects of plant antioxidants on neuron cell viability. / Norfaizatul, S. O.; Zetty Akmal, C. Z.; Noralisa, A. K.; Then, S. M.; Wan Zunnah, W. N.; Musalmah, M.

    In: Journal of Medicinal Plants, Vol. 9, No. SUPPL 6., 03.2010, p. 113-123.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Norfaizatul, SO, Zetty Akmal, CZ, Noralisa, AK, Then, SM, Wan Zunnah, WN & Musalmah, M 2010, 'Dual effects of plant antioxidants on neuron cell viability', Journal of Medicinal Plants, vol. 9, no. SUPPL 6., pp. 113-123.
    Norfaizatul SO, Zetty Akmal CZ, Noralisa AK, Then SM, Wan Zunnah WN, Musalmah M. Dual effects of plant antioxidants on neuron cell viability. Journal of Medicinal Plants. 2010 Mar;9(SUPPL 6.):113-123.
    Norfaizatul, S. O. ; Zetty Akmal, C. Z. ; Noralisa, A. K. ; Then, S. M. ; Wan Zunnah, W. N. ; Musalmah, M. / Dual effects of plant antioxidants on neuron cell viability. In: Journal of Medicinal Plants. 2010 ; Vol. 9, No. SUPPL 6. pp. 113-123.
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    abstract = "Background: Many studies have focused on oxidative stress induced damage and hence, the protective effects conferred by antioxidants. An example is neurodegenerative diseases which is thought to occur due to neuronal loss associated with oxidative stress. However, some antioxidants such as vitamin E have been shown to also exert pro-oxidative effects at high concentration. Objective: In this study the cytotoxicity and neuroprotective potentials of Chlorella vulgaris (CV), Momordica charantia (MC) and Piper betle (PB) were investigated and correlated with the antioxidant potential. Tocotrienol Rich Fraction (TRF) served as positive control since it had been shown previously to have high antioxidant potential as well as to exert neuroprotective and neurocytotoxic effects. Method: Free radical scavenging activities of hot water extract of CV, aqueous extract of MC, aqueous extract of PB and TRF were determined by using DPPH (1, 1-diphenyl-2-picryl-hydrazyl) assay. Cytotoxicity and neuroprotective effects were measured by using 3 - (4, 5 - dimethylthiazol-2-yl) -5-(3-carboxymethoxyphenyl)-2-(4-sulfophenyl)-2H- tetrazolium salt (MTS) against BSO-induced neuron cell death. Results: Results showed that TRF has the highest radical scavenging activity followed PB> MC> CV. The MTS results showed that TRF (1-50 μg/ml) as positive control, PB (0.001-10(μg/ml) and MC (1-50μg/ml) conferred significant protection against BSO-induced cell death. These plants were cytotoxic at high concentrations. However CV extract did not show significant neuroprotective effect against BSO-induced cell death nor cytotoxic effect. Conclusion: The present findings showed that plant extracts with the higher free radical scavenging activity showed neuroprotective effects at low concentrations but were cytotoxic at higher concentrations.",
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    AU - Norfaizatul, S. O.

    AU - Zetty Akmal, C. Z.

    AU - Noralisa, A. K.

    AU - Then, S. M.

    AU - Wan Zunnah, W. N.

    AU - Musalmah, M.

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    N2 - Background: Many studies have focused on oxidative stress induced damage and hence, the protective effects conferred by antioxidants. An example is neurodegenerative diseases which is thought to occur due to neuronal loss associated with oxidative stress. However, some antioxidants such as vitamin E have been shown to also exert pro-oxidative effects at high concentration. Objective: In this study the cytotoxicity and neuroprotective potentials of Chlorella vulgaris (CV), Momordica charantia (MC) and Piper betle (PB) were investigated and correlated with the antioxidant potential. Tocotrienol Rich Fraction (TRF) served as positive control since it had been shown previously to have high antioxidant potential as well as to exert neuroprotective and neurocytotoxic effects. Method: Free radical scavenging activities of hot water extract of CV, aqueous extract of MC, aqueous extract of PB and TRF were determined by using DPPH (1, 1-diphenyl-2-picryl-hydrazyl) assay. Cytotoxicity and neuroprotective effects were measured by using 3 - (4, 5 - dimethylthiazol-2-yl) -5-(3-carboxymethoxyphenyl)-2-(4-sulfophenyl)-2H- tetrazolium salt (MTS) against BSO-induced neuron cell death. Results: Results showed that TRF has the highest radical scavenging activity followed PB> MC> CV. The MTS results showed that TRF (1-50 μg/ml) as positive control, PB (0.001-10(μg/ml) and MC (1-50μg/ml) conferred significant protection against BSO-induced cell death. These plants were cytotoxic at high concentrations. However CV extract did not show significant neuroprotective effect against BSO-induced cell death nor cytotoxic effect. Conclusion: The present findings showed that plant extracts with the higher free radical scavenging activity showed neuroprotective effects at low concentrations but were cytotoxic at higher concentrations.

    AB - Background: Many studies have focused on oxidative stress induced damage and hence, the protective effects conferred by antioxidants. An example is neurodegenerative diseases which is thought to occur due to neuronal loss associated with oxidative stress. However, some antioxidants such as vitamin E have been shown to also exert pro-oxidative effects at high concentration. Objective: In this study the cytotoxicity and neuroprotective potentials of Chlorella vulgaris (CV), Momordica charantia (MC) and Piper betle (PB) were investigated and correlated with the antioxidant potential. Tocotrienol Rich Fraction (TRF) served as positive control since it had been shown previously to have high antioxidant potential as well as to exert neuroprotective and neurocytotoxic effects. Method: Free radical scavenging activities of hot water extract of CV, aqueous extract of MC, aqueous extract of PB and TRF were determined by using DPPH (1, 1-diphenyl-2-picryl-hydrazyl) assay. Cytotoxicity and neuroprotective effects were measured by using 3 - (4, 5 - dimethylthiazol-2-yl) -5-(3-carboxymethoxyphenyl)-2-(4-sulfophenyl)-2H- tetrazolium salt (MTS) against BSO-induced neuron cell death. Results: Results showed that TRF has the highest radical scavenging activity followed PB> MC> CV. The MTS results showed that TRF (1-50 μg/ml) as positive control, PB (0.001-10(μg/ml) and MC (1-50μg/ml) conferred significant protection against BSO-induced cell death. These plants were cytotoxic at high concentrations. However CV extract did not show significant neuroprotective effect against BSO-induced cell death nor cytotoxic effect. Conclusion: The present findings showed that plant extracts with the higher free radical scavenging activity showed neuroprotective effects at low concentrations but were cytotoxic at higher concentrations.

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    KW - Centella asiatica

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    KW - Momordica charantia

    KW - Neuroprotection

    KW - Piper betle

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