Does vitamin A supplementation protect schoolchildren from acquiring soil-transmitted helminthiasis? A randomized controlled trial

Hesham M. Al-Mekhlafi, Tengku Shahrul Anuar, Ebtesam M. Al-Zabedi, Mohamed T. Al-Maktari, Mohammed Ak Mahdy, Abdulhamid Ahmed, Atiya A. Sallam, Wan Ariffin Abdullah, Norhayati Moktar, Johari Surin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Despite the intensive global efforts to control intestinal parasitic infections, the prevalence of soil-transmitted helminth (STH) infections is still very high in many developing countries particularly among children in rural areas.

Methods. A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial was conducted on 250 Aboriginal schoolchildren in Malaysia to investigate the effects of a single high-dose of vitamin A supplementation (200 000 IU) on STH reinfection. The effect of the supplement was assessed at 3 and 6 months after receiving interventions; after a complete 3-day deworming course of 400 mg/daily of albendazole tablets.

Results: Almost all children (98.6%) were infected with at least one STH species. The overall prevalence of ascariasis, trichuriasis and hookworm infection was 67.8%, 95.5% and 13.4%, respectively. Reinfection rates of Ascaris, Trichuris and hookworm were high; at 6 months, assessment reached 80% of the prevalence reported before treatment. There were no significant differences in the reinfection rates and intensities of STH between vitamin A supplemented-children and those who received placebo at 3 and 6 months (p > 0.05).

Conclusions: Vitamin A supplementation showed no protective effect against STH reinfection and this could be due to the high endemicity of STH in this community. Long-term interventions to reduce poverty will help significantly in reducing this continuing problem and there is no doubt that reducing intestinal parasitic infection would have a positive impact on the health, nutrition and education of these children. Trial registration. This trial was registered at clinicaltrials.gov as NCT00936091.

Original languageEnglish
Article number367
JournalParasites and Vectors
Volume7
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 15 Aug 2014

Fingerprint

Helminthiasis
Helminths
Vitamin A
Soil
Randomized Controlled Trials
Parasitic Diseases
Trichuriasis
Placebos
Hookworm Infections
Ascariasis
Ascaris
Trichuris
Ancylostomatoidea
Albendazole
Malaysia
Poverty
Health Education
Developing Countries
Tablets
Infection

Keywords

  • Malaysia
  • Randomized clinical trial
  • Soil-transmitted helminths
  • Vitamin A

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Parasitology
  • Infectious Diseases

Cite this

Al-Mekhlafi, H. M., Anuar, T. S., Al-Zabedi, E. M., Al-Maktari, M. T., Mahdy, M. A., Ahmed, A., ... Surin, J. (2014). Does vitamin A supplementation protect schoolchildren from acquiring soil-transmitted helminthiasis? A randomized controlled trial. Parasites and Vectors, 7(1), [367]. https://doi.org/10.1186/1756-3305-7-367

Does vitamin A supplementation protect schoolchildren from acquiring soil-transmitted helminthiasis? A randomized controlled trial. / Al-Mekhlafi, Hesham M.; Anuar, Tengku Shahrul; Al-Zabedi, Ebtesam M.; Al-Maktari, Mohamed T.; Mahdy, Mohammed Ak; Ahmed, Abdulhamid; Sallam, Atiya A.; Abdullah, Wan Ariffin; Moktar, Norhayati; Surin, Johari.

In: Parasites and Vectors, Vol. 7, No. 1, 367, 15.08.2014.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Al-Mekhlafi, HM, Anuar, TS, Al-Zabedi, EM, Al-Maktari, MT, Mahdy, MA, Ahmed, A, Sallam, AA, Abdullah, WA, Moktar, N & Surin, J 2014, 'Does vitamin A supplementation protect schoolchildren from acquiring soil-transmitted helminthiasis? A randomized controlled trial', Parasites and Vectors, vol. 7, no. 1, 367. https://doi.org/10.1186/1756-3305-7-367
Al-Mekhlafi, Hesham M. ; Anuar, Tengku Shahrul ; Al-Zabedi, Ebtesam M. ; Al-Maktari, Mohamed T. ; Mahdy, Mohammed Ak ; Ahmed, Abdulhamid ; Sallam, Atiya A. ; Abdullah, Wan Ariffin ; Moktar, Norhayati ; Surin, Johari. / Does vitamin A supplementation protect schoolchildren from acquiring soil-transmitted helminthiasis? A randomized controlled trial. In: Parasites and Vectors. 2014 ; Vol. 7, No. 1.
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abstract = "Background: Despite the intensive global efforts to control intestinal parasitic infections, the prevalence of soil-transmitted helminth (STH) infections is still very high in many developing countries particularly among children in rural areas.Methods. A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial was conducted on 250 Aboriginal schoolchildren in Malaysia to investigate the effects of a single high-dose of vitamin A supplementation (200 000 IU) on STH reinfection. The effect of the supplement was assessed at 3 and 6 months after receiving interventions; after a complete 3-day deworming course of 400 mg/daily of albendazole tablets.Results: Almost all children (98.6{\%}) were infected with at least one STH species. The overall prevalence of ascariasis, trichuriasis and hookworm infection was 67.8{\%}, 95.5{\%} and 13.4{\%}, respectively. Reinfection rates of Ascaris, Trichuris and hookworm were high; at 6 months, assessment reached 80{\%} of the prevalence reported before treatment. There were no significant differences in the reinfection rates and intensities of STH between vitamin A supplemented-children and those who received placebo at 3 and 6 months (p > 0.05).Conclusions: Vitamin A supplementation showed no protective effect against STH reinfection and this could be due to the high endemicity of STH in this community. Long-term interventions to reduce poverty will help significantly in reducing this continuing problem and there is no doubt that reducing intestinal parasitic infection would have a positive impact on the health, nutrition and education of these children. Trial registration. This trial was registered at clinicaltrials.gov as NCT00936091.",
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AU - Al-Mekhlafi, Hesham M.

AU - Anuar, Tengku Shahrul

AU - Al-Zabedi, Ebtesam M.

AU - Al-Maktari, Mohamed T.

AU - Mahdy, Mohammed Ak

AU - Ahmed, Abdulhamid

AU - Sallam, Atiya A.

AU - Abdullah, Wan Ariffin

AU - Moktar, Norhayati

AU - Surin, Johari

PY - 2014/8/15

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N2 - Background: Despite the intensive global efforts to control intestinal parasitic infections, the prevalence of soil-transmitted helminth (STH) infections is still very high in many developing countries particularly among children in rural areas.Methods. A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial was conducted on 250 Aboriginal schoolchildren in Malaysia to investigate the effects of a single high-dose of vitamin A supplementation (200 000 IU) on STH reinfection. The effect of the supplement was assessed at 3 and 6 months after receiving interventions; after a complete 3-day deworming course of 400 mg/daily of albendazole tablets.Results: Almost all children (98.6%) were infected with at least one STH species. The overall prevalence of ascariasis, trichuriasis and hookworm infection was 67.8%, 95.5% and 13.4%, respectively. Reinfection rates of Ascaris, Trichuris and hookworm were high; at 6 months, assessment reached 80% of the prevalence reported before treatment. There were no significant differences in the reinfection rates and intensities of STH between vitamin A supplemented-children and those who received placebo at 3 and 6 months (p > 0.05).Conclusions: Vitamin A supplementation showed no protective effect against STH reinfection and this could be due to the high endemicity of STH in this community. Long-term interventions to reduce poverty will help significantly in reducing this continuing problem and there is no doubt that reducing intestinal parasitic infection would have a positive impact on the health, nutrition and education of these children. Trial registration. This trial was registered at clinicaltrials.gov as NCT00936091.

AB - Background: Despite the intensive global efforts to control intestinal parasitic infections, the prevalence of soil-transmitted helminth (STH) infections is still very high in many developing countries particularly among children in rural areas.Methods. A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial was conducted on 250 Aboriginal schoolchildren in Malaysia to investigate the effects of a single high-dose of vitamin A supplementation (200 000 IU) on STH reinfection. The effect of the supplement was assessed at 3 and 6 months after receiving interventions; after a complete 3-day deworming course of 400 mg/daily of albendazole tablets.Results: Almost all children (98.6%) were infected with at least one STH species. The overall prevalence of ascariasis, trichuriasis and hookworm infection was 67.8%, 95.5% and 13.4%, respectively. Reinfection rates of Ascaris, Trichuris and hookworm were high; at 6 months, assessment reached 80% of the prevalence reported before treatment. There were no significant differences in the reinfection rates and intensities of STH between vitamin A supplemented-children and those who received placebo at 3 and 6 months (p > 0.05).Conclusions: Vitamin A supplementation showed no protective effect against STH reinfection and this could be due to the high endemicity of STH in this community. Long-term interventions to reduce poverty will help significantly in reducing this continuing problem and there is no doubt that reducing intestinal parasitic infection would have a positive impact on the health, nutrition and education of these children. Trial registration. This trial was registered at clinicaltrials.gov as NCT00936091.

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KW - Vitamin A

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