Does traditional asian vegetables (ulam) consumption correlate with brain activity using fMRI? A study among aging adults from low-income households

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background: Working memory and cognitive flexibility are supported by the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC). Aging adults from low-income households are individuals with a high risk of cognitive decline who incorporate ulam in their daily diet. Purpose: To examine relationship between ulam consumption and the working memory and cognitive flexibility among aging adults from low-income households who are more susceptible to cognitive decline. Study Type: Cross-sectional. Population/Subjects: Thirty-two aging adults (45–75 years old). Field Strength/Sequence: Task-based fMRI, 3.0T, T1-weighted anatomical images, T2*-weighted imaging data. Assessment: The dietary and ulam consumption were assessed using the respective validated Dietary History and semiquantitative Food Frequency questionnaires. Working memory and cognitive flexibility were evaluated by using neuropsychological batteries (ie, mini-mental state examination [MMSE], Digit Span, and Rey auditory verbal learning test [RAVLT]) and task-based fMRI (N-back and Stroop Color Word Test [SCWT]). Brodmann's areas 9 and 46 were the regions of interest (ROIs) of DLPFC activation. Statistical Tests: Multiple linear regression used to understand the relationship between ulam consumption and the working memory and cognitive flexibility, while analysis of covariance (ANCOVA) was used to compare the difference of working memory and cognitive flexibility among four percentiles of ulam consumption, after age, gender, and education years adjustments. Significance was decided by two-sided, P < 0.0042 and P < 0.05. Results: The multiple linear regression revealed that ulam consumption was positively associated with the Digit Span (R2 = 0.51, β = 0.702, P < 0.001), right DLPFC activation (1-back) (R2 = 0.34, β = 0.591, P = 0.001), left DLPFC activation (SCWT-1) (R2 = 0.33, β = 0.553, P = 0.002), and left DLPFC activation (SCWT-2) (R2 = 0.34, β = 0.497, P = 0.004). The ulam consumption at the 75th and 100th percentile from the ANCOVA analysis had shown a better working memory and cognitive flexibility as compared with those of the 25th and 50th percentiles (P < 0.05). Data Conclusion: This study found that high ulam consumption was related to a high intensity of brain activation in DLPFC; however, the elucidation of the neuroprotective properties of ulam have yet to be established from clinical trial studies. Level of Evidence: 2. Technical Efficacy: Stage 4. J. Magn. Reson. Imaging 2019.

Original languageEnglish
JournalJournal of Magnetic Resonance Imaging
DOIs
Publication statusAccepted/In press - 1 Jan 2019

Fingerprint

Prefrontal Cortex
Short-Term Memory
Vegetables
Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Brain
Color
Linear Models
Social Adjustment
Verbal Learning
Cross-Sectional Studies
Clinical Trials
Diet
Education
Food
Population

Keywords

  • brain activation
  • cognitive
  • DLPFC
  • fMRI
  • ulam

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging

Cite this

@article{972c906a6803461ab058ff2653cda32d,
title = "Does traditional asian vegetables (ulam) consumption correlate with brain activity using fMRI? A study among aging adults from low-income households",
abstract = "Background: Working memory and cognitive flexibility are supported by the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC). Aging adults from low-income households are individuals with a high risk of cognitive decline who incorporate ulam in their daily diet. Purpose: To examine relationship between ulam consumption and the working memory and cognitive flexibility among aging adults from low-income households who are more susceptible to cognitive decline. Study Type: Cross-sectional. Population/Subjects: Thirty-two aging adults (45–75 years old). Field Strength/Sequence: Task-based fMRI, 3.0T, T1-weighted anatomical images, T2*-weighted imaging data. Assessment: The dietary and ulam consumption were assessed using the respective validated Dietary History and semiquantitative Food Frequency questionnaires. Working memory and cognitive flexibility were evaluated by using neuropsychological batteries (ie, mini-mental state examination [MMSE], Digit Span, and Rey auditory verbal learning test [RAVLT]) and task-based fMRI (N-back and Stroop Color Word Test [SCWT]). Brodmann's areas 9 and 46 were the regions of interest (ROIs) of DLPFC activation. Statistical Tests: Multiple linear regression used to understand the relationship between ulam consumption and the working memory and cognitive flexibility, while analysis of covariance (ANCOVA) was used to compare the difference of working memory and cognitive flexibility among four percentiles of ulam consumption, after age, gender, and education years adjustments. Significance was decided by two-sided, P < 0.0042 and P < 0.05. Results: The multiple linear regression revealed that ulam consumption was positively associated with the Digit Span (R2 = 0.51, β = 0.702, P < 0.001), right DLPFC activation (1-back) (R2 = 0.34, β = 0.591, P = 0.001), left DLPFC activation (SCWT-1) (R2 = 0.33, β = 0.553, P = 0.002), and left DLPFC activation (SCWT-2) (R2 = 0.34, β = 0.497, P = 0.004). The ulam consumption at the 75th and 100th percentile from the ANCOVA analysis had shown a better working memory and cognitive flexibility as compared with those of the 25th and 50th percentiles (P < 0.05). Data Conclusion: This study found that high ulam consumption was related to a high intensity of brain activation in DLPFC; however, the elucidation of the neuroprotective properties of ulam have yet to be established from clinical trial studies. Level of Evidence: 2. Technical Efficacy: Stage 4. J. Magn. Reson. Imaging 2019.",
keywords = "brain activation, cognitive, DLPFC, fMRI, ulam",
author = "You, {Yee Xing} and Suzana Shahar and Mazlyfarina Mohamad and Yahya, {Hanis Mastura} and Hasnah Haron and {Abdul Hamid}, Hamzaini",
year = "2019",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1002/jmri.26891",
language = "English",
journal = "Journal of Magnetic Resonance Imaging",
issn = "1053-1807",
publisher = "John Wiley and Sons Inc.",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Does traditional asian vegetables (ulam) consumption correlate with brain activity using fMRI? A study among aging adults from low-income households

AU - You, Yee Xing

AU - Shahar, Suzana

AU - Mohamad, Mazlyfarina

AU - Yahya, Hanis Mastura

AU - Haron, Hasnah

AU - Abdul Hamid, Hamzaini

PY - 2019/1/1

Y1 - 2019/1/1

N2 - Background: Working memory and cognitive flexibility are supported by the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC). Aging adults from low-income households are individuals with a high risk of cognitive decline who incorporate ulam in their daily diet. Purpose: To examine relationship between ulam consumption and the working memory and cognitive flexibility among aging adults from low-income households who are more susceptible to cognitive decline. Study Type: Cross-sectional. Population/Subjects: Thirty-two aging adults (45–75 years old). Field Strength/Sequence: Task-based fMRI, 3.0T, T1-weighted anatomical images, T2*-weighted imaging data. Assessment: The dietary and ulam consumption were assessed using the respective validated Dietary History and semiquantitative Food Frequency questionnaires. Working memory and cognitive flexibility were evaluated by using neuropsychological batteries (ie, mini-mental state examination [MMSE], Digit Span, and Rey auditory verbal learning test [RAVLT]) and task-based fMRI (N-back and Stroop Color Word Test [SCWT]). Brodmann's areas 9 and 46 were the regions of interest (ROIs) of DLPFC activation. Statistical Tests: Multiple linear regression used to understand the relationship between ulam consumption and the working memory and cognitive flexibility, while analysis of covariance (ANCOVA) was used to compare the difference of working memory and cognitive flexibility among four percentiles of ulam consumption, after age, gender, and education years adjustments. Significance was decided by two-sided, P < 0.0042 and P < 0.05. Results: The multiple linear regression revealed that ulam consumption was positively associated with the Digit Span (R2 = 0.51, β = 0.702, P < 0.001), right DLPFC activation (1-back) (R2 = 0.34, β = 0.591, P = 0.001), left DLPFC activation (SCWT-1) (R2 = 0.33, β = 0.553, P = 0.002), and left DLPFC activation (SCWT-2) (R2 = 0.34, β = 0.497, P = 0.004). The ulam consumption at the 75th and 100th percentile from the ANCOVA analysis had shown a better working memory and cognitive flexibility as compared with those of the 25th and 50th percentiles (P < 0.05). Data Conclusion: This study found that high ulam consumption was related to a high intensity of brain activation in DLPFC; however, the elucidation of the neuroprotective properties of ulam have yet to be established from clinical trial studies. Level of Evidence: 2. Technical Efficacy: Stage 4. J. Magn. Reson. Imaging 2019.

AB - Background: Working memory and cognitive flexibility are supported by the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC). Aging adults from low-income households are individuals with a high risk of cognitive decline who incorporate ulam in their daily diet. Purpose: To examine relationship between ulam consumption and the working memory and cognitive flexibility among aging adults from low-income households who are more susceptible to cognitive decline. Study Type: Cross-sectional. Population/Subjects: Thirty-two aging adults (45–75 years old). Field Strength/Sequence: Task-based fMRI, 3.0T, T1-weighted anatomical images, T2*-weighted imaging data. Assessment: The dietary and ulam consumption were assessed using the respective validated Dietary History and semiquantitative Food Frequency questionnaires. Working memory and cognitive flexibility were evaluated by using neuropsychological batteries (ie, mini-mental state examination [MMSE], Digit Span, and Rey auditory verbal learning test [RAVLT]) and task-based fMRI (N-back and Stroop Color Word Test [SCWT]). Brodmann's areas 9 and 46 were the regions of interest (ROIs) of DLPFC activation. Statistical Tests: Multiple linear regression used to understand the relationship between ulam consumption and the working memory and cognitive flexibility, while analysis of covariance (ANCOVA) was used to compare the difference of working memory and cognitive flexibility among four percentiles of ulam consumption, after age, gender, and education years adjustments. Significance was decided by two-sided, P < 0.0042 and P < 0.05. Results: The multiple linear regression revealed that ulam consumption was positively associated with the Digit Span (R2 = 0.51, β = 0.702, P < 0.001), right DLPFC activation (1-back) (R2 = 0.34, β = 0.591, P = 0.001), left DLPFC activation (SCWT-1) (R2 = 0.33, β = 0.553, P = 0.002), and left DLPFC activation (SCWT-2) (R2 = 0.34, β = 0.497, P = 0.004). The ulam consumption at the 75th and 100th percentile from the ANCOVA analysis had shown a better working memory and cognitive flexibility as compared with those of the 25th and 50th percentiles (P < 0.05). Data Conclusion: This study found that high ulam consumption was related to a high intensity of brain activation in DLPFC; however, the elucidation of the neuroprotective properties of ulam have yet to be established from clinical trial studies. Level of Evidence: 2. Technical Efficacy: Stage 4. J. Magn. Reson. Imaging 2019.

KW - brain activation

KW - cognitive

KW - DLPFC

KW - fMRI

KW - ulam

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85070692757&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85070692757&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1002/jmri.26891

DO - 10.1002/jmri.26891

M3 - Article

JO - Journal of Magnetic Resonance Imaging

JF - Journal of Magnetic Resonance Imaging

SN - 1053-1807

ER -