Does cooking affect the phytate content in local soy based dishes?

G. Shimi, Hasnah Haron

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This study aimed to determine the effect of cooking on phytate content and the inhibitory effects of phytate on the bioavailability of minerals in eight Malaysian soy based dishes. Phytate was analyzed by using anion-exchange chromatography while minerals were analyzed by using Atomic Absorption Spectrophotometer. Molar ratios were obtained by dividing the mole of phytate to minerals. Phytate content was reduced in cooked dishes compared to the raw ones but it was not significantly different (P > 0.05). Raw, cooked and whole dish soy products contained 257.14-900.00, 182.14-803.57 and 289.29-910.71 mg/100 g phytate, respectively. Boiling and steaming have reduced most phytate content in the food samples. Molar ratios for phytate/minerals in these samples (phytate/Ca >0.17; phytate/Fe >1) indicated that phytate content inhibited the absorption of calcium and iron. However, the ratio for Ca × phytate/Zn in all samples was less than 200 which showed that phytate did not affect the bioavailability of zinc.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)2873-2880
Number of pages8
JournalInternational Food Research Journal
Volume20
Issue number5
Publication statusPublished - 2013

Fingerprint

Phytic Acid
Cooking
phytic acid
cooking
Minerals
minerals
Biological Availability
bioavailability
soybean products
steaming
spectrophotometers
boiling
sampling
Anions
Chromatography
Zinc
foods

Keywords

  • Calcium
  • Iron
  • Molar ratio
  • Phytate
  • Zinc

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Food Science

Cite this

Does cooking affect the phytate content in local soy based dishes? / Shimi, G.; Haron, Hasnah.

In: International Food Research Journal, Vol. 20, No. 5, 2013, p. 2873-2880.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{1817264fc7a941c5be7c1c54a7457f53,
title = "Does cooking affect the phytate content in local soy based dishes?",
abstract = "This study aimed to determine the effect of cooking on phytate content and the inhibitory effects of phytate on the bioavailability of minerals in eight Malaysian soy based dishes. Phytate was analyzed by using anion-exchange chromatography while minerals were analyzed by using Atomic Absorption Spectrophotometer. Molar ratios were obtained by dividing the mole of phytate to minerals. Phytate content was reduced in cooked dishes compared to the raw ones but it was not significantly different (P > 0.05). Raw, cooked and whole dish soy products contained 257.14-900.00, 182.14-803.57 and 289.29-910.71 mg/100 g phytate, respectively. Boiling and steaming have reduced most phytate content in the food samples. Molar ratios for phytate/minerals in these samples (phytate/Ca >0.17; phytate/Fe >1) indicated that phytate content inhibited the absorption of calcium and iron. However, the ratio for Ca × phytate/Zn in all samples was less than 200 which showed that phytate did not affect the bioavailability of zinc.",
keywords = "Calcium, Iron, Molar ratio, Phytate, Zinc",
author = "G. Shimi and Hasnah Haron",
year = "2013",
language = "English",
volume = "20",
pages = "2873--2880",
journal = "International Food Research Journal",
issn = "1985-4668",
publisher = "Universiti Putra Malaysia",
number = "5",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Does cooking affect the phytate content in local soy based dishes?

AU - Shimi, G.

AU - Haron, Hasnah

PY - 2013

Y1 - 2013

N2 - This study aimed to determine the effect of cooking on phytate content and the inhibitory effects of phytate on the bioavailability of minerals in eight Malaysian soy based dishes. Phytate was analyzed by using anion-exchange chromatography while minerals were analyzed by using Atomic Absorption Spectrophotometer. Molar ratios were obtained by dividing the mole of phytate to minerals. Phytate content was reduced in cooked dishes compared to the raw ones but it was not significantly different (P > 0.05). Raw, cooked and whole dish soy products contained 257.14-900.00, 182.14-803.57 and 289.29-910.71 mg/100 g phytate, respectively. Boiling and steaming have reduced most phytate content in the food samples. Molar ratios for phytate/minerals in these samples (phytate/Ca >0.17; phytate/Fe >1) indicated that phytate content inhibited the absorption of calcium and iron. However, the ratio for Ca × phytate/Zn in all samples was less than 200 which showed that phytate did not affect the bioavailability of zinc.

AB - This study aimed to determine the effect of cooking on phytate content and the inhibitory effects of phytate on the bioavailability of minerals in eight Malaysian soy based dishes. Phytate was analyzed by using anion-exchange chromatography while minerals were analyzed by using Atomic Absorption Spectrophotometer. Molar ratios were obtained by dividing the mole of phytate to minerals. Phytate content was reduced in cooked dishes compared to the raw ones but it was not significantly different (P > 0.05). Raw, cooked and whole dish soy products contained 257.14-900.00, 182.14-803.57 and 289.29-910.71 mg/100 g phytate, respectively. Boiling and steaming have reduced most phytate content in the food samples. Molar ratios for phytate/minerals in these samples (phytate/Ca >0.17; phytate/Fe >1) indicated that phytate content inhibited the absorption of calcium and iron. However, the ratio for Ca × phytate/Zn in all samples was less than 200 which showed that phytate did not affect the bioavailability of zinc.

KW - Calcium

KW - Iron

KW - Molar ratio

KW - Phytate

KW - Zinc

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84887558911&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84887558911&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Article

VL - 20

SP - 2873

EP - 2880

JO - International Food Research Journal

JF - International Food Research Journal

SN - 1985-4668

IS - 5

ER -