Does compulsory training improve occupational safety and health implementation? The case of Malaysian

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The objective of this article was to investigate the effectiveness of occupational safety and health's (OSH) compulsory training since it has never been addressed before. Although previous researchers find that OSH training is very important as an intervention to create safety climate; however, some researchers find that compulsory training is ineffective as compared to optional training. Hence, findings of this current research offers original contribution by determining whether OSH's compulsory training could stimulate OSH implementation using a quasi-experimental design. An amount of 287 Malaysian participants attended 21 OSH's compulsory training organized by the Malaysian's National Institute of Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) in 2015 was taken for sample. A paired sample t-test indicates a significant implementation of OSH among respondents. In fact, 88.5% respondents passed learning examination at the end of training and majority or 98.3% respondents used what they learned in training at their respective workplaces after training completion. Additionally, using independent sample t-test, it is indicated that there is no significant different between respondents that felt they are mandated and voluntary to attend the OSH's compulsory training. Hence, it is verified that compulsory training could also be effective; in which, the NIOSH's compulsory training had stimulate OSH implementation among the Malaysian. Implications for future research and practice were also discussed.

Original languageEnglish
JournalSafety Science
DOIs
Publication statusAccepted/In press - 1 Jan 2018

Fingerprint

occupational safety
Occupational Health
Health
health
National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (U.S.)
Research Personnel
Design of experiments
Climate
Workplace
Research Design
Learning
Safety
workplace
climate

Keywords

  • Compulsory training effectiveness
  • Human resource development
  • NIOSH Malaysia
  • Occupational safety and health
  • Psychology industry and organization
  • Quasi-experiment

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Safety, Risk, Reliability and Quality
  • Safety Research
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

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abstract = "The objective of this article was to investigate the effectiveness of occupational safety and health's (OSH) compulsory training since it has never been addressed before. Although previous researchers find that OSH training is very important as an intervention to create safety climate; however, some researchers find that compulsory training is ineffective as compared to optional training. Hence, findings of this current research offers original contribution by determining whether OSH's compulsory training could stimulate OSH implementation using a quasi-experimental design. An amount of 287 Malaysian participants attended 21 OSH's compulsory training organized by the Malaysian's National Institute of Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) in 2015 was taken for sample. A paired sample t-test indicates a significant implementation of OSH among respondents. In fact, 88.5{\%} respondents passed learning examination at the end of training and majority or 98.3{\%} respondents used what they learned in training at their respective workplaces after training completion. Additionally, using independent sample t-test, it is indicated that there is no significant different between respondents that felt they are mandated and voluntary to attend the OSH's compulsory training. Hence, it is verified that compulsory training could also be effective; in which, the NIOSH's compulsory training had stimulate OSH implementation among the Malaysian. Implications for future research and practice were also discussed.",
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