Does anxious patients require more propofol at induction?

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background: Preoperative anxiety increases postoperative analgesic requirement, prolongs hospital stay and results in poor patient satisfaction. We investigated the correlation of preoperative state of anxiety on propofol requirement at induction of anesthesia and vital signs. Methodology: This prospective study recruited 52 ASA I and II patients scheduled for surgery under general anesthesia. The Malay version of Generalized Anxiety Disorder-7 questionnaire was used to assess preoperative anxiety state. Anesthesia was induced with propofol infusion using the Schnider protocol to achieve target plasma concentration of 4 µg/ml. Baseline systolic blood pressure and heart rate (HR) prior to induction were recorded. The amount of propofol required until loss of consciousness, and bispectral index (BIS) values immediate post induction were recorded. Pearson’s correlation coefficient was used to assess relationship. Results: There was no correlation between the preoperative state of anxiety and propofol requirement at induction (r = 0.07, p = 0.580), and systolic blood pressure prior to induction (r = 0.23, p = 0.101). However, weak positive correlations were detected between preoperative state of anxiety and the HR prior to induction (r = 0.27, p = 0.050), and with BIS at loss of consciousness (r = 0.32, p = 0.026).However, no correlation was seen between propofol requirement for induction with HR prior to induction (r = 0.13, p = 0.37). Anxious patients were unable to sleep well pre-operatively (p = 0.009). Conclusion: Preoperative state of anxiety does not influence propofol requirement for induction of anesthesia.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)419-423
Number of pages5
JournalAnaesthesia, Pain and Intensive Care
Volume22
Issue number4
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jan 2018

Fingerprint

Propofol
Anxiety
Blood Pressure
Unconsciousness
Anesthesia
Heart Rate
Vital Signs
Anxiety Disorders
Patient Satisfaction
General Anesthesia
Analgesics
Length of Stay
Sleep
Prospective Studies

Keywords

  • Anxiety
  • General anesthesia
  • Induction of anesthesia
  • Propofol
  • TIVA

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Critical Care and Intensive Care Medicine
  • Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine

Cite this

Does anxious patients require more propofol at induction? / Masri, Syarifah Noor Nazihah Sayed; Abdul Rahman, Raha; Azlina, Masdar; Wan Mat, Wan Rahiza; Md Nor, Nadia; Izaham, Azarinah.

In: Anaesthesia, Pain and Intensive Care, Vol. 22, No. 4, 01.01.2018, p. 419-423.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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