Doctors' knowledge regarding radiation dose and its associated risks

Cross-sectional study in a tertiary hospital in Malaysia

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: Radiological investigations that use ionising radiation pose well-established risks to patients. Doses per patient from computed tomographic examinations constitute large radiation burdens, particularly with recurrent imaging and multidetector machines. Yet, referring doctors often have a poor understanding of these risks. The objective of this study was to assess knowledge regarding medical radiation exposure and its associated risks among non-radiology doctors of all grades at the Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia Medical Centre. Methods: This was a cross-sectional study conducted by convenience sampling, using questionnaires distributed during radiology meetings. Inclusion criteria constituted: any doctor from a non-radiology specialty serving in our institution during the period between June 2006 and January 2007. Doctors affiliated to the radiology department were excluded. Results: Responses from 178 doctors were analysed. Of these, 7 (4%) and 61 (34%) of the respondents were not aware that ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging, respectively, do not emit ionising radiation. Nine (5%) respondents provided accurate dose estimates for commonly requested investigations which utilise ionising radiation, 66 (37%) believed there was an increased cancer risk in adults, whilst 41 (23%) were aware of the increased cancer risk in children. Conclusion: There was a lack of awareness of radiation doses and risk of carcinogenesis, particularly that among children. There is a need to disseminate information regarding radiation dose and the possible risks to the non-radiology medical community.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)71-79
Number of pages9
JournalHong Kong Journal of Radiology
Volume15
Issue number2
Publication statusPublished - Jun 2012

Fingerprint

Malaysia
Tertiary Care Centers
Cross-Sectional Studies
Radiation
Ionizing Radiation
Radiology
Neoplasms
Carcinogenesis
Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Surveys and Questionnaires

Keywords

  • Medical staff, hospital
  • Questionnaires
  • Radiation dosage
  • Radiation, ionizing
  • Radiography/adverse effects

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging

Cite this

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title = "Doctors' knowledge regarding radiation dose and its associated risks: Cross-sectional study in a tertiary hospital in Malaysia",
abstract = "Objective: Radiological investigations that use ionising radiation pose well-established risks to patients. Doses per patient from computed tomographic examinations constitute large radiation burdens, particularly with recurrent imaging and multidetector machines. Yet, referring doctors often have a poor understanding of these risks. The objective of this study was to assess knowledge regarding medical radiation exposure and its associated risks among non-radiology doctors of all grades at the Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia Medical Centre. Methods: This was a cross-sectional study conducted by convenience sampling, using questionnaires distributed during radiology meetings. Inclusion criteria constituted: any doctor from a non-radiology specialty serving in our institution during the period between June 2006 and January 2007. Doctors affiliated to the radiology department were excluded. Results: Responses from 178 doctors were analysed. Of these, 7 (4{\%}) and 61 (34{\%}) of the respondents were not aware that ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging, respectively, do not emit ionising radiation. Nine (5{\%}) respondents provided accurate dose estimates for commonly requested investigations which utilise ionising radiation, 66 (37{\%}) believed there was an increased cancer risk in adults, whilst 41 (23{\%}) were aware of the increased cancer risk in children. Conclusion: There was a lack of awareness of radiation doses and risk of carcinogenesis, particularly that among children. There is a need to disseminate information regarding radiation dose and the possible risks to the non-radiology medical community.",
keywords = "Medical staff, hospital, Questionnaires, Radiation dosage, Radiation, ionizing, Radiography/adverse effects",
author = "Kew, {Thean Yean} and Zahiah Mohamed and {Syed Zakaria}, {Syed Zulkifli} and {Abdullah @ Muda}, Noraidatulakma and Hatta Sidi",
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AU - Kew, Thean Yean

AU - Mohamed, Zahiah

AU - Syed Zakaria, Syed Zulkifli

AU - Abdullah @ Muda, Noraidatulakma

AU - Sidi, Hatta

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N2 - Objective: Radiological investigations that use ionising radiation pose well-established risks to patients. Doses per patient from computed tomographic examinations constitute large radiation burdens, particularly with recurrent imaging and multidetector machines. Yet, referring doctors often have a poor understanding of these risks. The objective of this study was to assess knowledge regarding medical radiation exposure and its associated risks among non-radiology doctors of all grades at the Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia Medical Centre. Methods: This was a cross-sectional study conducted by convenience sampling, using questionnaires distributed during radiology meetings. Inclusion criteria constituted: any doctor from a non-radiology specialty serving in our institution during the period between June 2006 and January 2007. Doctors affiliated to the radiology department were excluded. Results: Responses from 178 doctors were analysed. Of these, 7 (4%) and 61 (34%) of the respondents were not aware that ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging, respectively, do not emit ionising radiation. Nine (5%) respondents provided accurate dose estimates for commonly requested investigations which utilise ionising radiation, 66 (37%) believed there was an increased cancer risk in adults, whilst 41 (23%) were aware of the increased cancer risk in children. Conclusion: There was a lack of awareness of radiation doses and risk of carcinogenesis, particularly that among children. There is a need to disseminate information regarding radiation dose and the possible risks to the non-radiology medical community.

AB - Objective: Radiological investigations that use ionising radiation pose well-established risks to patients. Doses per patient from computed tomographic examinations constitute large radiation burdens, particularly with recurrent imaging and multidetector machines. Yet, referring doctors often have a poor understanding of these risks. The objective of this study was to assess knowledge regarding medical radiation exposure and its associated risks among non-radiology doctors of all grades at the Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia Medical Centre. Methods: This was a cross-sectional study conducted by convenience sampling, using questionnaires distributed during radiology meetings. Inclusion criteria constituted: any doctor from a non-radiology specialty serving in our institution during the period between June 2006 and January 2007. Doctors affiliated to the radiology department were excluded. Results: Responses from 178 doctors were analysed. Of these, 7 (4%) and 61 (34%) of the respondents were not aware that ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging, respectively, do not emit ionising radiation. Nine (5%) respondents provided accurate dose estimates for commonly requested investigations which utilise ionising radiation, 66 (37%) believed there was an increased cancer risk in adults, whilst 41 (23%) were aware of the increased cancer risk in children. Conclusion: There was a lack of awareness of radiation doses and risk of carcinogenesis, particularly that among children. There is a need to disseminate information regarding radiation dose and the possible risks to the non-radiology medical community.

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KW - Radiation, ionizing

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