Docosahexaenoic acid-concentrated fish oil supplementation in subjects with mild cognitive impairment (MCI): A 12-month randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial

Lai Kuan Lee, Suzana Shahar, Ai Vyrn Chin, Noor Aini Mohd Yusoff

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

95 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Rationale: Epidemiological studies have suggested a beneficial effect of fish oil supplementation in halting the initial progression of Alzheimer's disease. However, it remains unclear whether fish oil affects cognitive function in older people with mild cognitive impairment (MCI). Objectives: This study investigated the effects of fish oil supplementation on cognitive function in elderly person with MCI. Methods: This was a 12-month, randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled study using fish oil supplementation with concentrated docosahexaenoic acid (DHA). Thirty six low-socioeconomic-status elderly subjects with MCI were randomly assigned to receive either concentrated DHA fish oil (n = 18) or placebo (n = 18) capsules. The changes of memory, psychomotor speed, executive function and attention, and visual-constructive skills were assessed using cognitive tests. Secondary outcomes were safety and tolerability of the DHA concentrate. Results: The fish oil group showed significant improvement in short-term and working memory (F = 9.890; ηp 2 = 0.254; p < 0.0001), immediate verbal memory (F = 3.715; ηp 2 = 0.114; p < 0.05) and delayed recall capability (F = 3.986; ηp 2 = 0.121; p < 0.05). The 12-month change in memory (p < 0.01) was significantly better in the fish oil group. Fish oil consumption was well tolerated, and the side effects were minimal and self-limiting. Conclusions: This study suggested the potential role of fish oil to improve memory function in MCI subjects. Studies with larger sample sizes, longer intervention periods, different fish oil dosages and genetic determinations should be investigated before definite recommendations can be made.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)605-612
Number of pages8
JournalPsychopharmacology
Volume225
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Feb 2013

Fingerprint

compound A 12
Docosahexaenoic Acids
Fish Oils
Placebos
Short-Term Memory
Cognition
Cognitive Dysfunction
Executive Function
Social Class
Sample Size
Capsules
Epidemiologic Studies
Alzheimer Disease
Safety

Keywords

  • Cognitive function
  • Docosahexaenoic acid
  • Fish oil
  • Memory
  • Mild cognitive impairment

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pharmacology

Cite this

Docosahexaenoic acid-concentrated fish oil supplementation in subjects with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) : A 12-month randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial. / Lee, Lai Kuan; Shahar, Suzana; Chin, Ai Vyrn; Yusoff, Noor Aini Mohd.

In: Psychopharmacology, Vol. 225, No. 3, 02.2013, p. 605-612.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{c192b630846a4e7db7ee75856113cfa1,
title = "Docosahexaenoic acid-concentrated fish oil supplementation in subjects with mild cognitive impairment (MCI): A 12-month randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial",
abstract = "Rationale: Epidemiological studies have suggested a beneficial effect of fish oil supplementation in halting the initial progression of Alzheimer's disease. However, it remains unclear whether fish oil affects cognitive function in older people with mild cognitive impairment (MCI). Objectives: This study investigated the effects of fish oil supplementation on cognitive function in elderly person with MCI. Methods: This was a 12-month, randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled study using fish oil supplementation with concentrated docosahexaenoic acid (DHA). Thirty six low-socioeconomic-status elderly subjects with MCI were randomly assigned to receive either concentrated DHA fish oil (n = 18) or placebo (n = 18) capsules. The changes of memory, psychomotor speed, executive function and attention, and visual-constructive skills were assessed using cognitive tests. Secondary outcomes were safety and tolerability of the DHA concentrate. Results: The fish oil group showed significant improvement in short-term and working memory (F = 9.890; ηp 2 = 0.254; p < 0.0001), immediate verbal memory (F = 3.715; ηp 2 = 0.114; p < 0.05) and delayed recall capability (F = 3.986; ηp 2 = 0.121; p < 0.05). The 12-month change in memory (p < 0.01) was significantly better in the fish oil group. Fish oil consumption was well tolerated, and the side effects were minimal and self-limiting. Conclusions: This study suggested the potential role of fish oil to improve memory function in MCI subjects. Studies with larger sample sizes, longer intervention periods, different fish oil dosages and genetic determinations should be investigated before definite recommendations can be made.",
keywords = "Cognitive function, Docosahexaenoic acid, Fish oil, Memory, Mild cognitive impairment",
author = "Lee, {Lai Kuan} and Suzana Shahar and Chin, {Ai Vyrn} and Yusoff, {Noor Aini Mohd}",
year = "2013",
month = "2",
doi = "10.1007/s00213-012-2848-0",
language = "English",
volume = "225",
pages = "605--612",
journal = "Psychopharmacology",
issn = "0033-3158",
publisher = "Springer Verlag",
number = "3",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Docosahexaenoic acid-concentrated fish oil supplementation in subjects with mild cognitive impairment (MCI)

T2 - A 12-month randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial

AU - Lee, Lai Kuan

AU - Shahar, Suzana

AU - Chin, Ai Vyrn

AU - Yusoff, Noor Aini Mohd

PY - 2013/2

Y1 - 2013/2

N2 - Rationale: Epidemiological studies have suggested a beneficial effect of fish oil supplementation in halting the initial progression of Alzheimer's disease. However, it remains unclear whether fish oil affects cognitive function in older people with mild cognitive impairment (MCI). Objectives: This study investigated the effects of fish oil supplementation on cognitive function in elderly person with MCI. Methods: This was a 12-month, randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled study using fish oil supplementation with concentrated docosahexaenoic acid (DHA). Thirty six low-socioeconomic-status elderly subjects with MCI were randomly assigned to receive either concentrated DHA fish oil (n = 18) or placebo (n = 18) capsules. The changes of memory, psychomotor speed, executive function and attention, and visual-constructive skills were assessed using cognitive tests. Secondary outcomes were safety and tolerability of the DHA concentrate. Results: The fish oil group showed significant improvement in short-term and working memory (F = 9.890; ηp 2 = 0.254; p < 0.0001), immediate verbal memory (F = 3.715; ηp 2 = 0.114; p < 0.05) and delayed recall capability (F = 3.986; ηp 2 = 0.121; p < 0.05). The 12-month change in memory (p < 0.01) was significantly better in the fish oil group. Fish oil consumption was well tolerated, and the side effects were minimal and self-limiting. Conclusions: This study suggested the potential role of fish oil to improve memory function in MCI subjects. Studies with larger sample sizes, longer intervention periods, different fish oil dosages and genetic determinations should be investigated before definite recommendations can be made.

AB - Rationale: Epidemiological studies have suggested a beneficial effect of fish oil supplementation in halting the initial progression of Alzheimer's disease. However, it remains unclear whether fish oil affects cognitive function in older people with mild cognitive impairment (MCI). Objectives: This study investigated the effects of fish oil supplementation on cognitive function in elderly person with MCI. Methods: This was a 12-month, randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled study using fish oil supplementation with concentrated docosahexaenoic acid (DHA). Thirty six low-socioeconomic-status elderly subjects with MCI were randomly assigned to receive either concentrated DHA fish oil (n = 18) or placebo (n = 18) capsules. The changes of memory, psychomotor speed, executive function and attention, and visual-constructive skills were assessed using cognitive tests. Secondary outcomes were safety and tolerability of the DHA concentrate. Results: The fish oil group showed significant improvement in short-term and working memory (F = 9.890; ηp 2 = 0.254; p < 0.0001), immediate verbal memory (F = 3.715; ηp 2 = 0.114; p < 0.05) and delayed recall capability (F = 3.986; ηp 2 = 0.121; p < 0.05). The 12-month change in memory (p < 0.01) was significantly better in the fish oil group. Fish oil consumption was well tolerated, and the side effects were minimal and self-limiting. Conclusions: This study suggested the potential role of fish oil to improve memory function in MCI subjects. Studies with larger sample sizes, longer intervention periods, different fish oil dosages and genetic determinations should be investigated before definite recommendations can be made.

KW - Cognitive function

KW - Docosahexaenoic acid

KW - Fish oil

KW - Memory

KW - Mild cognitive impairment

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84873720956&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84873720956&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1007/s00213-012-2848-0

DO - 10.1007/s00213-012-2848-0

M3 - Article

C2 - 22932777

AN - SCOPUS:84873720956

VL - 225

SP - 605

EP - 612

JO - Psychopharmacology

JF - Psychopharmacology

SN - 0033-3158

IS - 3

ER -