Do exercises improve back pain in pregnancy?

Muhammad Azrai Abu, Nur Azurah Abdul Ghani, Pei Shan Lim, Aqmar Suraya Sulaiman, Mohd Hashim Omar, Mohd Hisam Muhamad Ariffin, Azmi Baharuddin, Shuhaila Shohaimi, Zuraidah Che Man

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

To assess the efficacy of an exercise program towards reducing back pain in pregnant women. In this prospective control study, 145 low risk pregnant women who scored more than 20 for functional limitation assessment were recruited. The severity of back pain was assessed using the visual analoque scale (VAS) and the functional limitation was assessed using the Oswestry disability questionnaire (ODQ). All participants were informed of back care measures and provided with Paracetamol as an adjunct analgesia. The intervention group will have a session with a trained physiotherapist. Subsequently, all participants will be required to fill in a similar questionnaire regarding pain intensity and functional limitation assessment after 6 weeks post-intervention. There was a significant reduction in the VAS score and improvement in functional ODQ score in the intervention group. The median usage of Paracetamol as an analgesia to control back pain in the control group was 500 mg higher than the intervention group. There was a weak association of age, parity, duration of back pain, and body mass index with functional ODQ score at 6 week following intervention. The back pain exercise reducing program was effective in reducing back pain intensity and analgesia usage with a significant improvement in functional ability.

Original languageEnglish
Article number20170012
JournalHormone Molecular Biology and Clinical Investigation
Volume32
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 20 Dec 2017

Fingerprint

Back Pain
Exercise
Pregnancy
Analgesia
Acetaminophen
Pregnant Women
Aptitude
Physical Therapists
Parity
Body Mass Index
Prospective Studies
Pain
Control Groups
Surveys and Questionnaires

Keywords

  • analgesia
  • back pain
  • education
  • exercise
  • physiotherapy
  • pregnancy

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism
  • Molecular Biology
  • Endocrinology

Cite this

Do exercises improve back pain in pregnancy? / Abu, Muhammad Azrai; Abdul Ghani, Nur Azurah; Lim, Pei Shan; Sulaiman, Aqmar Suraya; Omar, Mohd Hashim; Muhamad Ariffin, Mohd Hisam; Baharuddin, Azmi; Shohaimi, Shuhaila; Man, Zuraidah Che.

In: Hormone Molecular Biology and Clinical Investigation, Vol. 32, No. 3, 20170012, 20.12.2017.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abu, Muhammad Azrai ; Abdul Ghani, Nur Azurah ; Lim, Pei Shan ; Sulaiman, Aqmar Suraya ; Omar, Mohd Hashim ; Muhamad Ariffin, Mohd Hisam ; Baharuddin, Azmi ; Shohaimi, Shuhaila ; Man, Zuraidah Che. / Do exercises improve back pain in pregnancy?. In: Hormone Molecular Biology and Clinical Investigation. 2017 ; Vol. 32, No. 3.
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