DNA fingerprinting of methicillin-resistant staphylococcus aureus by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE)

Comparison of strains from 2 Malaysian hospitals

A. Norazah, S. M. Liew, Mohamed Kamel Abdul Ghani, Y. T. Koh, V. K E Lim

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

10 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Aim of Study: To determine and compare the pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) patterns of endemic MRSA strains in 2 major Malaysian hospitals and to compare the PFGE patterns with antibiotypes of the strains studied. Methods: Fifty-six MRSA strains selected randomly between September 1997 and July 1998 from Hospital Queen Elizabeth (HQE) and Hospital Umum Sarawak (HUS) were tested for antimicrobial resistance and DNA fingerprinting was carried out by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) technique. Results: Seven PFGE types were recognised (A, B, C, D, E and F). All 7 PFGE types were observed in HQE while only 2 PFGE types (B, C) were noted in HUS strains. There is a predominance of a single PFGE pattern (type B) in both hospitals, as seen in 46% of HQE strains and 89% of HUS strains. Subtype B2 was the commonest subtype in HQE while subtype BI predominated in HUS. Strains resistant to fusidic acid and rifampicin exhibited PFGE type F that is unique to HQE. All strains were resistant to penicillin, erythromycin, cotrimoxazole, tetracycline and gentamicin. Strains with the same antibiotic susceptibility pattern can be different PFGE types. Conclusion: Molecular typing of the MRSA by PFGE is a useful tool in the study of endemic strains present in an institution. Strains in HQE were found to be more heterogeneous than HUS strains. Common PFGE types can also be seen in both hospitals suggesting that some of the strains was genetically related and has propagated within and between the 2 hospitals. Our findings also indicate that the relationship between antibiotic susceptibility and PFGE patterns was not close and antibiograms should not be relied upon for typing strains in epidemiological studies. By knowing the DNA fingerprints of the isolates endemic in each hospital, the spread of MRSA with a particular PFGE type can be monitored within and between hospitals.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)15-19
Number of pages5
JournalSingapore Medical Journal
Volume42
Issue number1
Publication statusPublished - Jan 2001

Fingerprint

DNA Fingerprinting
Pulsed Field Gel Electrophoresis
Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus
Malaysia
Fusidic Acid
Anti-Bacterial Agents
Molecular Typing
Sulfamethoxazole Drug Combination Trimethoprim
Microbial Sensitivity Tests
Erythromycin
Rifampin
Gentamicins
Tetracycline

Keywords

  • DNA fingerprinting
  • Malaysia
  • MRSA
  • PFGE

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

DNA fingerprinting of methicillin-resistant staphylococcus aureus by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) : Comparison of strains from 2 Malaysian hospitals. / Norazah, A.; Liew, S. M.; Abdul Ghani, Mohamed Kamel; Koh, Y. T.; Lim, V. K E.

In: Singapore Medical Journal, Vol. 42, No. 1, 01.2001, p. 15-19.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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abstract = "Aim of Study: To determine and compare the pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) patterns of endemic MRSA strains in 2 major Malaysian hospitals and to compare the PFGE patterns with antibiotypes of the strains studied. Methods: Fifty-six MRSA strains selected randomly between September 1997 and July 1998 from Hospital Queen Elizabeth (HQE) and Hospital Umum Sarawak (HUS) were tested for antimicrobial resistance and DNA fingerprinting was carried out by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) technique. Results: Seven PFGE types were recognised (A, B, C, D, E and F). All 7 PFGE types were observed in HQE while only 2 PFGE types (B, C) were noted in HUS strains. There is a predominance of a single PFGE pattern (type B) in both hospitals, as seen in 46{\%} of HQE strains and 89{\%} of HUS strains. Subtype B2 was the commonest subtype in HQE while subtype BI predominated in HUS. Strains resistant to fusidic acid and rifampicin exhibited PFGE type F that is unique to HQE. All strains were resistant to penicillin, erythromycin, cotrimoxazole, tetracycline and gentamicin. Strains with the same antibiotic susceptibility pattern can be different PFGE types. Conclusion: Molecular typing of the MRSA by PFGE is a useful tool in the study of endemic strains present in an institution. Strains in HQE were found to be more heterogeneous than HUS strains. Common PFGE types can also be seen in both hospitals suggesting that some of the strains was genetically related and has propagated within and between the 2 hospitals. Our findings also indicate that the relationship between antibiotic susceptibility and PFGE patterns was not close and antibiograms should not be relied upon for typing strains in epidemiological studies. By knowing the DNA fingerprints of the isolates endemic in each hospital, the spread of MRSA with a particular PFGE type can be monitored within and between hospitals.",
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AB - Aim of Study: To determine and compare the pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) patterns of endemic MRSA strains in 2 major Malaysian hospitals and to compare the PFGE patterns with antibiotypes of the strains studied. Methods: Fifty-six MRSA strains selected randomly between September 1997 and July 1998 from Hospital Queen Elizabeth (HQE) and Hospital Umum Sarawak (HUS) were tested for antimicrobial resistance and DNA fingerprinting was carried out by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) technique. Results: Seven PFGE types were recognised (A, B, C, D, E and F). All 7 PFGE types were observed in HQE while only 2 PFGE types (B, C) were noted in HUS strains. There is a predominance of a single PFGE pattern (type B) in both hospitals, as seen in 46% of HQE strains and 89% of HUS strains. Subtype B2 was the commonest subtype in HQE while subtype BI predominated in HUS. Strains resistant to fusidic acid and rifampicin exhibited PFGE type F that is unique to HQE. All strains were resistant to penicillin, erythromycin, cotrimoxazole, tetracycline and gentamicin. Strains with the same antibiotic susceptibility pattern can be different PFGE types. Conclusion: Molecular typing of the MRSA by PFGE is a useful tool in the study of endemic strains present in an institution. Strains in HQE were found to be more heterogeneous than HUS strains. Common PFGE types can also be seen in both hospitals suggesting that some of the strains was genetically related and has propagated within and between the 2 hospitals. Our findings also indicate that the relationship between antibiotic susceptibility and PFGE patterns was not close and antibiograms should not be relied upon for typing strains in epidemiological studies. By knowing the DNA fingerprints of the isolates endemic in each hospital, the spread of MRSA with a particular PFGE type can be monitored within and between hospitals.

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