DNA fingerprinting of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) in a teaching hospital in Malaysia

Alfizah Hanafiah, A. Norazah, Nordiah Awg. Jalil, V. K E Lim

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8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) has been prevalent in our hospital over the last three years. Differentiation among MRSA strains by DNA typing in addition to antibiotic resistance pattern surveillance is crucial in order to implement infection control measures. The aim of this study was to characterize MRSA isolates from patients admitted to Hospital Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia (HUKM) by phenotypic (analyses of antibiotic susceptibility pattern) and genotypic (PFGE) techniques to determine the genetic relatedness of the MRSA involved and to identify endemic clonal profiles of MRSA circulating in HUKM. Seventy one MRSA strains collected between January to March 2000 from patients from various wards in HUKM were tested for antimicrobial resistance and typed by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). Four major types of PFGE patterns were identified (A, B, C and D) among MRSA strains. Two predominant PFGE types were recognised, Type A (59.2%) and Type B (33.8%). Most of these strains were isolated from ICU, Surgical wards and Medical wards. MRSA strains with different PFGE patterns appeared to be widespread among wards. Strains with the same antibiotype could be of different PFGE types. Most of isolates were resistant to ciprofloxacin, erythromycin. gentamicin and penicillin. One isolate with a unique PFGE pattern Type D and susceptible to gentamicin was identified as a different clone. Some isolates obtained from the same patient showed different PFGE subtypes suggesting that these patients were infected/colonized with multiple MRSA strains. PFGE analysis suggests that MRSA strains with different PFGE types was propagated within our hospital. The relationship between antibiotic susceptibility and PFGE patterns was independent. The ability of PFGE technique in differentiating our MRSA strains make it a method of choice for investigating the source, transmission and spread of nosocomial MILSA INIRSA infection, and thus an appropriate control programme can be implemented to prevent the spread of MILSA infection.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)319-328
Number of pages10
JournalMedical Journal of Malaysia
Volume57
Issue number3
Publication statusPublished - Sep 2002

Fingerprint

DNA Fingerprinting
Pulsed Field Gel Electrophoresis
Malaysia
Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus
Teaching Hospitals
Gentamicins
Anti-Bacterial Agents
Erythromycin
Ciprofloxacin
Infection Control
Microbial Drug Resistance
Infection
Penicillins
Clone Cells

Keywords

  • Malaysia
  • MRSA
  • Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE)

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

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title = "DNA fingerprinting of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) in a teaching hospital in Malaysia",
abstract = "Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) has been prevalent in our hospital over the last three years. Differentiation among MRSA strains by DNA typing in addition to antibiotic resistance pattern surveillance is crucial in order to implement infection control measures. The aim of this study was to characterize MRSA isolates from patients admitted to Hospital Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia (HUKM) by phenotypic (analyses of antibiotic susceptibility pattern) and genotypic (PFGE) techniques to determine the genetic relatedness of the MRSA involved and to identify endemic clonal profiles of MRSA circulating in HUKM. Seventy one MRSA strains collected between January to March 2000 from patients from various wards in HUKM were tested for antimicrobial resistance and typed by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). Four major types of PFGE patterns were identified (A, B, C and D) among MRSA strains. Two predominant PFGE types were recognised, Type A (59.2{\%}) and Type B (33.8{\%}). Most of these strains were isolated from ICU, Surgical wards and Medical wards. MRSA strains with different PFGE patterns appeared to be widespread among wards. Strains with the same antibiotype could be of different PFGE types. Most of isolates were resistant to ciprofloxacin, erythromycin. gentamicin and penicillin. One isolate with a unique PFGE pattern Type D and susceptible to gentamicin was identified as a different clone. Some isolates obtained from the same patient showed different PFGE subtypes suggesting that these patients were infected/colonized with multiple MRSA strains. PFGE analysis suggests that MRSA strains with different PFGE types was propagated within our hospital. The relationship between antibiotic susceptibility and PFGE patterns was independent. The ability of PFGE technique in differentiating our MRSA strains make it a method of choice for investigating the source, transmission and spread of nosocomial MILSA INIRSA infection, and thus an appropriate control programme can be implemented to prevent the spread of MILSA infection.",
keywords = "Malaysia, MRSA, Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE)",
author = "Alfizah Hanafiah and A. Norazah and {Awg. Jalil}, Nordiah and Lim, {V. K E}",
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AU - Lim, V. K E

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N2 - Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) has been prevalent in our hospital over the last three years. Differentiation among MRSA strains by DNA typing in addition to antibiotic resistance pattern surveillance is crucial in order to implement infection control measures. The aim of this study was to characterize MRSA isolates from patients admitted to Hospital Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia (HUKM) by phenotypic (analyses of antibiotic susceptibility pattern) and genotypic (PFGE) techniques to determine the genetic relatedness of the MRSA involved and to identify endemic clonal profiles of MRSA circulating in HUKM. Seventy one MRSA strains collected between January to March 2000 from patients from various wards in HUKM were tested for antimicrobial resistance and typed by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). Four major types of PFGE patterns were identified (A, B, C and D) among MRSA strains. Two predominant PFGE types were recognised, Type A (59.2%) and Type B (33.8%). Most of these strains were isolated from ICU, Surgical wards and Medical wards. MRSA strains with different PFGE patterns appeared to be widespread among wards. Strains with the same antibiotype could be of different PFGE types. Most of isolates were resistant to ciprofloxacin, erythromycin. gentamicin and penicillin. One isolate with a unique PFGE pattern Type D and susceptible to gentamicin was identified as a different clone. Some isolates obtained from the same patient showed different PFGE subtypes suggesting that these patients were infected/colonized with multiple MRSA strains. PFGE analysis suggests that MRSA strains with different PFGE types was propagated within our hospital. The relationship between antibiotic susceptibility and PFGE patterns was independent. The ability of PFGE technique in differentiating our MRSA strains make it a method of choice for investigating the source, transmission and spread of nosocomial MILSA INIRSA infection, and thus an appropriate control programme can be implemented to prevent the spread of MILSA infection.

AB - Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) has been prevalent in our hospital over the last three years. Differentiation among MRSA strains by DNA typing in addition to antibiotic resistance pattern surveillance is crucial in order to implement infection control measures. The aim of this study was to characterize MRSA isolates from patients admitted to Hospital Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia (HUKM) by phenotypic (analyses of antibiotic susceptibility pattern) and genotypic (PFGE) techniques to determine the genetic relatedness of the MRSA involved and to identify endemic clonal profiles of MRSA circulating in HUKM. Seventy one MRSA strains collected between January to March 2000 from patients from various wards in HUKM were tested for antimicrobial resistance and typed by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). Four major types of PFGE patterns were identified (A, B, C and D) among MRSA strains. Two predominant PFGE types were recognised, Type A (59.2%) and Type B (33.8%). Most of these strains were isolated from ICU, Surgical wards and Medical wards. MRSA strains with different PFGE patterns appeared to be widespread among wards. Strains with the same antibiotype could be of different PFGE types. Most of isolates were resistant to ciprofloxacin, erythromycin. gentamicin and penicillin. One isolate with a unique PFGE pattern Type D and susceptible to gentamicin was identified as a different clone. Some isolates obtained from the same patient showed different PFGE subtypes suggesting that these patients were infected/colonized with multiple MRSA strains. PFGE analysis suggests that MRSA strains with different PFGE types was propagated within our hospital. The relationship between antibiotic susceptibility and PFGE patterns was independent. The ability of PFGE technique in differentiating our MRSA strains make it a method of choice for investigating the source, transmission and spread of nosocomial MILSA INIRSA infection, and thus an appropriate control programme can be implemented to prevent the spread of MILSA infection.

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