Diversity of Malaysian insectivorous bat assemblages revisited

Lee Sim Lim, Adura Mohd-Adnan, Zubaid Akbar Mukhtar Ahmad, Matthew J. Struebig, Stephen J. Rossiter

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

To what extent tropical forest persisted in the Malay-Thai Peninsula during the Last Glacial Maximum, or contracted southwards with subsequent post-glacial expansion, has long been debated. These competing scenarios might be expected to have left contrasting broad spatial patterns of diversity of forest-dependent taxa. To test for a post-glacial northward spread of forest, we examined latitudinal clines of forest-dependent bat species at 15 forest sites across Peninsular Malaysia. From captures of 3776 insectivorous forest bats, we found that low richness characterized the north of the study area: predicted richness of 9-16 species, compared with 21-23 in the south. Predicted species richness decreased significantly with increasing latitude, but showed no relationship with either seasonality or peninsula width. Analyses of beta-diversity showed that differences between communities were not related to geographical distance, although there was evidence of greater differences in species numbers between the most distant sites. Assemblages were consistently dominated by six cave-roosting species from the families Rhinolophidae and Hipposideridae, while another 16 species were consistently rare. We suggest that these observed patterns are consistent with the hypothesized northward expansion of tropical rain forest since the Last Glacial Maximum, but emphasize that more surveys in the extreme north and south of the peninsula are required to support this assertion.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)111-121
Number of pages11
JournalJournal of Tropical Ecology
Volume30
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Mar 2014

Fingerprint

bat
Chiroptera
Last Glacial Maximum
Postglacial
Rhinolophidae
roosting
cline
tropical rain forests
interspecific variation
caves
Malaysia
tropical forests
tropical forest
seasonality
cave
species richness
species diversity
testing

Keywords

  • Alpha diversity
  • Beta diversity
  • Chiroptera
  • Community structure
  • Palaeotropics
  • South-East Asia
  • Species richness
  • Tropical forest

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Ecology, Evolution, Behavior and Systematics

Cite this

Diversity of Malaysian insectivorous bat assemblages revisited. / Lim, Lee Sim; Mohd-Adnan, Adura; Mukhtar Ahmad, Zubaid Akbar; Struebig, Matthew J.; Rossiter, Stephen J.

In: Journal of Tropical Ecology, Vol. 30, No. 2, 03.2014, p. 111-121.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Lim, Lee Sim ; Mohd-Adnan, Adura ; Mukhtar Ahmad, Zubaid Akbar ; Struebig, Matthew J. ; Rossiter, Stephen J. / Diversity of Malaysian insectivorous bat assemblages revisited. In: Journal of Tropical Ecology. 2014 ; Vol. 30, No. 2. pp. 111-121.
@article{3c67549016fc4e28ba630c1a8f7d8e9f,
title = "Diversity of Malaysian insectivorous bat assemblages revisited",
abstract = "To what extent tropical forest persisted in the Malay-Thai Peninsula during the Last Glacial Maximum, or contracted southwards with subsequent post-glacial expansion, has long been debated. These competing scenarios might be expected to have left contrasting broad spatial patterns of diversity of forest-dependent taxa. To test for a post-glacial northward spread of forest, we examined latitudinal clines of forest-dependent bat species at 15 forest sites across Peninsular Malaysia. From captures of 3776 insectivorous forest bats, we found that low richness characterized the north of the study area: predicted richness of 9-16 species, compared with 21-23 in the south. Predicted species richness decreased significantly with increasing latitude, but showed no relationship with either seasonality or peninsula width. Analyses of beta-diversity showed that differences between communities were not related to geographical distance, although there was evidence of greater differences in species numbers between the most distant sites. Assemblages were consistently dominated by six cave-roosting species from the families Rhinolophidae and Hipposideridae, while another 16 species were consistently rare. We suggest that these observed patterns are consistent with the hypothesized northward expansion of tropical rain forest since the Last Glacial Maximum, but emphasize that more surveys in the extreme north and south of the peninsula are required to support this assertion.",
keywords = "Alpha diversity, Beta diversity, Chiroptera, Community structure, Palaeotropics, South-East Asia, Species richness, Tropical forest",
author = "Lim, {Lee Sim} and Adura Mohd-Adnan and {Mukhtar Ahmad}, {Zubaid Akbar} and Struebig, {Matthew J.} and Rossiter, {Stephen J.}",
year = "2014",
month = "3",
doi = "10.1017/S0266467413000874",
language = "English",
volume = "30",
pages = "111--121",
journal = "Journal of Tropical Ecology",
issn = "0266-4674",
publisher = "Cambridge University Press",
number = "2",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Diversity of Malaysian insectivorous bat assemblages revisited

AU - Lim, Lee Sim

AU - Mohd-Adnan, Adura

AU - Mukhtar Ahmad, Zubaid Akbar

AU - Struebig, Matthew J.

AU - Rossiter, Stephen J.

PY - 2014/3

Y1 - 2014/3

N2 - To what extent tropical forest persisted in the Malay-Thai Peninsula during the Last Glacial Maximum, or contracted southwards with subsequent post-glacial expansion, has long been debated. These competing scenarios might be expected to have left contrasting broad spatial patterns of diversity of forest-dependent taxa. To test for a post-glacial northward spread of forest, we examined latitudinal clines of forest-dependent bat species at 15 forest sites across Peninsular Malaysia. From captures of 3776 insectivorous forest bats, we found that low richness characterized the north of the study area: predicted richness of 9-16 species, compared with 21-23 in the south. Predicted species richness decreased significantly with increasing latitude, but showed no relationship with either seasonality or peninsula width. Analyses of beta-diversity showed that differences between communities were not related to geographical distance, although there was evidence of greater differences in species numbers between the most distant sites. Assemblages were consistently dominated by six cave-roosting species from the families Rhinolophidae and Hipposideridae, while another 16 species were consistently rare. We suggest that these observed patterns are consistent with the hypothesized northward expansion of tropical rain forest since the Last Glacial Maximum, but emphasize that more surveys in the extreme north and south of the peninsula are required to support this assertion.

AB - To what extent tropical forest persisted in the Malay-Thai Peninsula during the Last Glacial Maximum, or contracted southwards with subsequent post-glacial expansion, has long been debated. These competing scenarios might be expected to have left contrasting broad spatial patterns of diversity of forest-dependent taxa. To test for a post-glacial northward spread of forest, we examined latitudinal clines of forest-dependent bat species at 15 forest sites across Peninsular Malaysia. From captures of 3776 insectivorous forest bats, we found that low richness characterized the north of the study area: predicted richness of 9-16 species, compared with 21-23 in the south. Predicted species richness decreased significantly with increasing latitude, but showed no relationship with either seasonality or peninsula width. Analyses of beta-diversity showed that differences between communities were not related to geographical distance, although there was evidence of greater differences in species numbers between the most distant sites. Assemblages were consistently dominated by six cave-roosting species from the families Rhinolophidae and Hipposideridae, while another 16 species were consistently rare. We suggest that these observed patterns are consistent with the hypothesized northward expansion of tropical rain forest since the Last Glacial Maximum, but emphasize that more surveys in the extreme north and south of the peninsula are required to support this assertion.

KW - Alpha diversity

KW - Beta diversity

KW - Chiroptera

KW - Community structure

KW - Palaeotropics

KW - South-East Asia

KW - Species richness

KW - Tropical forest

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84893703498&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84893703498&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1017/S0266467413000874

DO - 10.1017/S0266467413000874

M3 - Article

VL - 30

SP - 111

EP - 121

JO - Journal of Tropical Ecology

JF - Journal of Tropical Ecology

SN - 0266-4674

IS - 2

ER -