Distribution of intestinal parasitic infections amongst aborigine children at Post Sungai Rual, Kelantan, Malaysia

Y. Hartini, G. Geishamimi, A. Z. Mariam, Mohamed Kamel Abdul Ghani, Hidayatul Fathi Othman, Ismarulyusda Ishak

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4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Intestinal parasitic infections are important public health problems among underprivileged communities. This study was carried out to evaluate the infection rate of intestinal parasites among aborigine children at Pos Sungai Rual, Kelantan, Malaysia. A total of 111 faecal samples from aborigine children aged 4-12 years were screened for intestinal parasites by direct smear technique. Harada-Mori culture was also performed to identify hookworm and Strongyloides stercoralis larvae. The results showed that 87.4% of the children examined were positive for one or more parasites. Intestinal parasites were significantly lower in boys (78.7%) as compared to girls (93.8%). The infection occurred in very young children aged 4-6 years (80.0%) and the percentage of parasite-positive cases appeared to be significantly higher (92.9%) among the children aged 7-9 years. Trichuris trichiura was the most common parasite found in aborigine children (65.8%). Low socioeconomic status, poor environmental sanitation and poor personal hygiene are possible contributing factors that increase the rate of intestinal parasitic infections among the children. Thus, the parasitic diseases will continue to threaten the people's health especially among communities from rural areas if no appropriate actions are taken to diminish the transmission of the parasites.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)596-601
Number of pages6
JournalTropical Biomedicine
Volume30
Issue number4
Publication statusPublished - Dec 2013

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Parasitic Diseases
Malaysia
Parasites
Strongyloides stercoralis
Trichuris
Ancylostomatoidea
Morus
Sanitation
Rural Population
Infection
Hygiene
Social Class
Larva
Public Health
Health

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Infectious Diseases
  • Parasitology

Cite this

Distribution of intestinal parasitic infections amongst aborigine children at Post Sungai Rual, Kelantan, Malaysia. / Hartini, Y.; Geishamimi, G.; Mariam, A. Z.; Abdul Ghani, Mohamed Kamel; Othman, Hidayatul Fathi; Ishak, Ismarulyusda.

In: Tropical Biomedicine, Vol. 30, No. 4, 12.2013, p. 596-601.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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