Distribution of Helicobacter pylori cagA, cagE and vacA in different ethnic groups in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia

Huck Joo Tan, Mohd Rizal Abdul Manaf, Mohamed Yusoff Rosmadi, Khean Lee Goh

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

43 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background and Aims: There is a geographic variation in Helicobacter pylori (HP) genotypes and virulence factors. Cytotoxin associated genes A (cagA) and E (cagE), and certain vacuolating cytotoxin (vacA) genotypes are associated with peptic ulcer disease (PUD). There is also a different prevalence of PUD among different ethnic groups in Malaysia. The present study compared the distribution of vacA alleles and cagA and cagE status in three ethnic groups residing in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, and their association with clinical outcome. Methods: All patients with cultured positive HP were recruited prospectively. DNA was extracted and polymerase chain reaction was carried out to determine the cagA and cagE status and vacA alleles. Results: The results of 127 patients (72 men and 55 women) were included. The mean age was 55.53 ± 12.52 years. The ethnic distribution was 59 Chinese, 38 Indian and 30 Malay patients. The predominant genotype was sla among the Malay (76.6%) and Indian patients (71.0%), and sic among the Chinese patients (66.1%). The vacA middle region sequence m1 was detected in 66.7% of Malay, 54.2% of Chinese and 76.3% of Indian patients. Of the Malay, Chinese and Indian patients, 76.6%, 86.4% and 86.8%, respectively, were cagA positive, and 70.0%, 39.0% and 81.6%, respectively, were cagE positve. HP cagA, cagE and vacA were not associated with PUD. Conclusion: There is a distinctive difference in the HP strains among the three ethnic groups in Malaysia. There was no association between cagA, cagE or vacA genotypes and clinical outcome in the patients. None of these markers are helpful in predicting the clinical presentation of a HP infection.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)589-594
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology (Australia)
Volume20
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2005

Fingerprint

Malaysia
Cytotoxins
Ethnic Groups
Helicobacter pylori
Genes
Peptic Ulcer
Genotype
Alleles
Helicobacter Infections
Virulence Factors
Polymerase Chain Reaction
DNA

Keywords

  • Different races
  • Helicobacter pylori genotypes
  • Virulence factors

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Gastroenterology
  • Hepatology

Cite this

Distribution of Helicobacter pylori cagA, cagE and vacA in different ethnic groups in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. / Tan, Huck Joo; Abdul Manaf, Mohd Rizal; Rosmadi, Mohamed Yusoff; Goh, Khean Lee.

In: Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology (Australia), Vol. 20, No. 4, 2005, p. 589-594.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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abstract = "Background and Aims: There is a geographic variation in Helicobacter pylori (HP) genotypes and virulence factors. Cytotoxin associated genes A (cagA) and E (cagE), and certain vacuolating cytotoxin (vacA) genotypes are associated with peptic ulcer disease (PUD). There is also a different prevalence of PUD among different ethnic groups in Malaysia. The present study compared the distribution of vacA alleles and cagA and cagE status in three ethnic groups residing in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, and their association with clinical outcome. Methods: All patients with cultured positive HP were recruited prospectively. DNA was extracted and polymerase chain reaction was carried out to determine the cagA and cagE status and vacA alleles. Results: The results of 127 patients (72 men and 55 women) were included. The mean age was 55.53 ± 12.52 years. The ethnic distribution was 59 Chinese, 38 Indian and 30 Malay patients. The predominant genotype was sla among the Malay (76.6{\%}) and Indian patients (71.0{\%}), and sic among the Chinese patients (66.1{\%}). The vacA middle region sequence m1 was detected in 66.7{\%} of Malay, 54.2{\%} of Chinese and 76.3{\%} of Indian patients. Of the Malay, Chinese and Indian patients, 76.6{\%}, 86.4{\%} and 86.8{\%}, respectively, were cagA positive, and 70.0{\%}, 39.0{\%} and 81.6{\%}, respectively, were cagE positve. HP cagA, cagE and vacA were not associated with PUD. Conclusion: There is a distinctive difference in the HP strains among the three ethnic groups in Malaysia. There was no association between cagA, cagE or vacA genotypes and clinical outcome in the patients. None of these markers are helpful in predicting the clinical presentation of a HP infection.",
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