Direct impact of flash floods in Kuala Lumpur City: Secondary data-based analysis

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Flash floods are the most common and disruptive hydro-meteorological phenomena that Malaysian cities experience most often. The capital city of the country, especially, is experiencing more incidences of flash floods than the past. Although flash flood does not always confine to monsoon seasons, the city experiences flash flood more frequently in this period of time of the years. While several mitigative and adaptive initiatives have been implemented, flash floods are still a major concern in the city. Therefore, it is important to revisit the matters for achieving the sustainability of Kuala Lumpur, bringing balance in the urban development and flood management. Understanding flash flood impact is also important for proper set-up and implementation of land use regulations, implementing stricter laws about socio-economic development of catchment areas. This paper quantitively analyses the direct impact of flash flood based on loss and damage perspectives. It focuses on the direct tangible and intangible impact of the flash flood in the city. That is to delineate what direct consequences are being actually experienced when the flash flood take place in the city. Flash floods are handled by these two separate departments in the city: Kuala Lumpur City Hall (DBKL) deals with drainage and street related flash flood while Drainage and Irrigation Department (DID) deals with river-related flash floods. This paper focuses on both stakeholders at the same time. The results show that the roads and highways, houses and vehicles are directly affected, damaged and disrupted by flash floods.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)145-157
Number of pages13
JournalASM Science Journal
Volume11
Issue number3
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jan 2018

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flash flood
city
analysis
drainage
road
capital city
urban development
stakeholder
monsoon
economic development

Keywords

  • Direct impact
  • Flash
  • Foods

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • General

Cite this

Direct impact of flash floods in Kuala Lumpur City : Secondary data-based analysis. / Bhuiyan, Tariqur Rahman; Reza, Mohammad Imam Hasan; Er, Ah Choy; Pereira, Joy Jacqueline.

In: ASM Science Journal, Vol. 11, No. 3, 01.01.2018, p. 145-157.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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