Dietary intake assessment in adults and its association with weight status and dental caries

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Abstract

This cross-sectional study was designed to determine the relationship between dietary intake with body composition and dental caries experience among adults at the dental clinic in Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia (UKM). The dietary compositions of the participants were estimated by using a multiple-pass 24hour recall method. A sugar checklist was used to determine the most popular sugary food/beverages categories consumed. Anthropometric measurements (height and weight measurements) were taken. Dental caries experience was charted clinically and was reported using the Decayed/Missing/Filled Teeth Index (DMFT). Participant's consumption for cereal groups, meat groups, fruits and vegetables group met the recommendation of the Malaysian food pyramid. Male participants consumed significantly higher energy, carbohydrate, fat and sugar than female participants. The total daily added sugar intake among the caries-free group was significantly lower than that in the group with caries. There was no significant difference in energy intake, protein intake, fat intake and total sugar intake between BMI classes; however the carbohydrate intake was significantly different. A significant correlation was found between carbohydrate consumption and BMI. There was also a significant correlation between BMI and DMFT score. The most popular sugary food/beverages category among participants was sugar and sweeteners added to beverages followed by biscuits and pastry. The least popular choice was breakfast cereal. The results indicated that adults with caries consumed significantly higher amounts of added sugar in their daily diet. The study shows that sugar remains an undeniable risk for dental caries and highlights that sugary foods and beverages remains a favorite of participants.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1066-1072
Number of pages7
JournalPakistan Journal of Nutrition
Volume11
Issue number11
Publication statusPublished - 2012

Fingerprint

dental caries
Food and Beverages
Dental Caries
DMF Index
food intake
Carbohydrates
sugars
Weights and Measures
beverages
Fats
Dental Clinics
Sweetening Agents
Breakfast
Malaysia
Beverages
teeth
Body Composition
Energy Intake
Checklist
Vegetables

Keywords

  • Body mass index
  • Dental caries
  • Dietary intake
  • Obesity
  • Overweight

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Food Science
  • Nutrition and Dietetics
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

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abstract = "This cross-sectional study was designed to determine the relationship between dietary intake with body composition and dental caries experience among adults at the dental clinic in Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia (UKM). The dietary compositions of the participants were estimated by using a multiple-pass 24hour recall method. A sugar checklist was used to determine the most popular sugary food/beverages categories consumed. Anthropometric measurements (height and weight measurements) were taken. Dental caries experience was charted clinically and was reported using the Decayed/Missing/Filled Teeth Index (DMFT). Participant's consumption for cereal groups, meat groups, fruits and vegetables group met the recommendation of the Malaysian food pyramid. Male participants consumed significantly higher energy, carbohydrate, fat and sugar than female participants. The total daily added sugar intake among the caries-free group was significantly lower than that in the group with caries. There was no significant difference in energy intake, protein intake, fat intake and total sugar intake between BMI classes; however the carbohydrate intake was significantly different. A significant correlation was found between carbohydrate consumption and BMI. There was also a significant correlation between BMI and DMFT score. The most popular sugary food/beverages category among participants was sugar and sweeteners added to beverages followed by biscuits and pastry. The least popular choice was breakfast cereal. The results indicated that adults with caries consumed significantly higher amounts of added sugar in their daily diet. The study shows that sugar remains an undeniable risk for dental caries and highlights that sugary foods and beverages remains a favorite of participants.",
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