Dietary intake and iodine deficiency in women of childbearing age in an Orang Asli community close to Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia

Carmen C. Cuthbertson, Bhensri Naemiratch, Lisa M. Thompson, Ali Osman, Jane H. Paterson, Geoffrey C. Marks, Mohd S. Hanafiah, Zaleha Md Isa

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

A cross-sectional study was conducted in order to determine the prevalence of Iodine Deficiency Disorders (IDD) and associated factors in women of childbearing age. The study was conducted in a small Orang Asli (indigenous Malay) community, 46 km south-east of Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. Women without children or who were not pregnant with their first child were excluded. Of the 45 women eligible, four women did not participate as they were absent from the village for the duration of the study. Thyroid palpation and urinary iodine level were used to determine the prevalence of IDD. The consumption of foods rich in iodine was determined using a food frequency questionnaire. The study population had a high prevalence (32.4%) of goitre and a very low median urinary iodine level (14.5 ± 11.5 μg/L, n = 34). This corresponds to 'severe iodine deficiency' according to World Health Organization classifications. Freshwater fish was the most frequently consumed iodine source. Cassava, which is considered goitrogenic due to its thiocyanate content, was a staple food and was consumed daily by 43% of the participants. Most staple foods were locally produced. Women with goitre had significantly lower protein and energy intakes than did those without. The IDD prevalence found in this study was similar to the prevalence reported in remote Malaysian communities. Possible factors contributing to IDD in various other studies were dependence on locally produced foods from potentially iodine deficient soils, frequent consumption of cassava, and low intake of seafood. Although this Orang Asli community was close to Kuala Lumpur and not remote, these factors were reflected in the current study. This implies that 'pockets' of IDD in Peninsular Malaysia may be more widespread than previously thought and highlights the need for further investigation of IDD in Peninsular Malaysia.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)36-40
Number of pages5
JournalAsia Pacific Journal of Clinical Nutrition
Volume9
Issue number1
Publication statusPublished - 2000

Fingerprint

Malaysia
Iodine
Food
Manihot
Goiter
Seafood
Palpation
Energy Intake
Fresh Water
Thyroid Gland
Fishes
Soil
Cross-Sectional Studies

Keywords

  • Dietary intake
  • Iodine deficiency disorders (IDD)
  • Malaysia
  • Micronutrients
  • Orang Asli

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)

Cite this

Dietary intake and iodine deficiency in women of childbearing age in an Orang Asli community close to Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. / Cuthbertson, Carmen C.; Naemiratch, Bhensri; Thompson, Lisa M.; Osman, Ali; Paterson, Jane H.; Marks, Geoffrey C.; Hanafiah, Mohd S.; Md Isa, Zaleha.

In: Asia Pacific Journal of Clinical Nutrition, Vol. 9, No. 1, 2000, p. 36-40.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Cuthbertson, CC, Naemiratch, B, Thompson, LM, Osman, A, Paterson, JH, Marks, GC, Hanafiah, MS & Md Isa, Z 2000, 'Dietary intake and iodine deficiency in women of childbearing age in an Orang Asli community close to Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia', Asia Pacific Journal of Clinical Nutrition, vol. 9, no. 1, pp. 36-40.
Cuthbertson, Carmen C. ; Naemiratch, Bhensri ; Thompson, Lisa M. ; Osman, Ali ; Paterson, Jane H. ; Marks, Geoffrey C. ; Hanafiah, Mohd S. ; Md Isa, Zaleha. / Dietary intake and iodine deficiency in women of childbearing age in an Orang Asli community close to Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. In: Asia Pacific Journal of Clinical Nutrition. 2000 ; Vol. 9, No. 1. pp. 36-40.
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