Dietary habits and dental caries occurrence among young children: Does the relationship still exist?

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Abstract

Introduction: The role of diet in the aetiology of dental caries occurrence has been questioned recently. Aim: This cross-sectional study was conducted to determine the relationship between dietary habits and dental caries among 105 children aged 2 to 5 years old in Kuala Lumpur. Methodology: Subjects were selected using convenient sampling method. Their body weight and height were measured and their dental check-up was performed by qualified dental nurses. A Structured questionnaire and 3-day food diaries were distributed to their parents/caretakers to obtain socio-demographic data, oral health practice and dietary habits of the subjects. The dft (decayed, filled teeth) score was used to describe dental caries incidence. Results: Caries was found in 36.6% subjects with mean dft score of 1.95±3.59 (range: 0-16). Energy (r=-0.334, p=0.008), carbohydrate (r=-0.353, p=0.005), fat (r=-0.325, p=0.01), protein (r=-0.264, p=0.038), and calcium (r=-0.470, p<0.001) intake were significantly correlated with dft score. The negative association between frequency of milk consumption and dental caries was lost after other confounding factors were considered. Dental caries incidence was associated with age of subjects started brushing their teeth (Adjusted OR=5.46, 95% CI=1.74 - 17.17). There was no relationship between frequency of daily meals (p=0.800) and sugary food/drinks consumption (p=0.489) with dental caries occurrence. Conclusion: Dental caries is prevalent among young children and related with dietary factors and oral health practices. Therefore, healthy dietary habits and oral health practice should be integrated in the oral health promotion targeted to parents/caregivers and young children in order to improve their dental health status.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)9-20
Number of pages12
JournalMalaysian Journal of Medicine and Health Sciences
Volume9
Issue number1
Publication statusPublished - Jan 2013

Fingerprint

Dental Caries
Feeding Behavior
Tooth
Oral Health
Parents
Dental Assistants
Diet Records
Body Height
Incidence
Health Promotion
Caregivers
Health Status
Meals
Milk
Cross-Sectional Studies
Fats
Body Weight
Carbohydrates
Demography
Diet

Keywords

  • Dental caries
  • Dietary habits
  • Sugary drinks
  • Sugary foods
  • Young children

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

@article{9fe3cfe18c52491597f1099611fb6634,
title = "Dietary habits and dental caries occurrence among young children: Does the relationship still exist?",
abstract = "Introduction: The role of diet in the aetiology of dental caries occurrence has been questioned recently. Aim: This cross-sectional study was conducted to determine the relationship between dietary habits and dental caries among 105 children aged 2 to 5 years old in Kuala Lumpur. Methodology: Subjects were selected using convenient sampling method. Their body weight and height were measured and their dental check-up was performed by qualified dental nurses. A Structured questionnaire and 3-day food diaries were distributed to their parents/caretakers to obtain socio-demographic data, oral health practice and dietary habits of the subjects. The dft (decayed, filled teeth) score was used to describe dental caries incidence. Results: Caries was found in 36.6{\%} subjects with mean dft score of 1.95±3.59 (range: 0-16). Energy (r=-0.334, p=0.008), carbohydrate (r=-0.353, p=0.005), fat (r=-0.325, p=0.01), protein (r=-0.264, p=0.038), and calcium (r=-0.470, p<0.001) intake were significantly correlated with dft score. The negative association between frequency of milk consumption and dental caries was lost after other confounding factors were considered. Dental caries incidence was associated with age of subjects started brushing their teeth (Adjusted OR=5.46, 95{\%} CI=1.74 - 17.17). There was no relationship between frequency of daily meals (p=0.800) and sugary food/drinks consumption (p=0.489) with dental caries occurrence. Conclusion: Dental caries is prevalent among young children and related with dietary factors and oral health practices. Therefore, healthy dietary habits and oral health practice should be integrated in the oral health promotion targeted to parents/caregivers and young children in order to improve their dental health status.",
keywords = "Dental caries, Dietary habits, Sugary drinks, Sugary foods, Young children",
author = "{Abdul Manaf}, Zahara and {Nur Ili}, {M. T.} and Yahya, {Nurul Asyikin}",
year = "2013",
month = "1",
language = "English",
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journal = "Malaysian Journal of Medicine and Health Sciences",
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TY - JOUR

T1 - Dietary habits and dental caries occurrence among young children

T2 - Does the relationship still exist?

AU - Abdul Manaf, Zahara

AU - Nur Ili, M. T.

AU - Yahya, Nurul Asyikin

PY - 2013/1

Y1 - 2013/1

N2 - Introduction: The role of diet in the aetiology of dental caries occurrence has been questioned recently. Aim: This cross-sectional study was conducted to determine the relationship between dietary habits and dental caries among 105 children aged 2 to 5 years old in Kuala Lumpur. Methodology: Subjects were selected using convenient sampling method. Their body weight and height were measured and their dental check-up was performed by qualified dental nurses. A Structured questionnaire and 3-day food diaries were distributed to their parents/caretakers to obtain socio-demographic data, oral health practice and dietary habits of the subjects. The dft (decayed, filled teeth) score was used to describe dental caries incidence. Results: Caries was found in 36.6% subjects with mean dft score of 1.95±3.59 (range: 0-16). Energy (r=-0.334, p=0.008), carbohydrate (r=-0.353, p=0.005), fat (r=-0.325, p=0.01), protein (r=-0.264, p=0.038), and calcium (r=-0.470, p<0.001) intake were significantly correlated with dft score. The negative association between frequency of milk consumption and dental caries was lost after other confounding factors were considered. Dental caries incidence was associated with age of subjects started brushing their teeth (Adjusted OR=5.46, 95% CI=1.74 - 17.17). There was no relationship between frequency of daily meals (p=0.800) and sugary food/drinks consumption (p=0.489) with dental caries occurrence. Conclusion: Dental caries is prevalent among young children and related with dietary factors and oral health practices. Therefore, healthy dietary habits and oral health practice should be integrated in the oral health promotion targeted to parents/caregivers and young children in order to improve their dental health status.

AB - Introduction: The role of diet in the aetiology of dental caries occurrence has been questioned recently. Aim: This cross-sectional study was conducted to determine the relationship between dietary habits and dental caries among 105 children aged 2 to 5 years old in Kuala Lumpur. Methodology: Subjects were selected using convenient sampling method. Their body weight and height were measured and their dental check-up was performed by qualified dental nurses. A Structured questionnaire and 3-day food diaries were distributed to their parents/caretakers to obtain socio-demographic data, oral health practice and dietary habits of the subjects. The dft (decayed, filled teeth) score was used to describe dental caries incidence. Results: Caries was found in 36.6% subjects with mean dft score of 1.95±3.59 (range: 0-16). Energy (r=-0.334, p=0.008), carbohydrate (r=-0.353, p=0.005), fat (r=-0.325, p=0.01), protein (r=-0.264, p=0.038), and calcium (r=-0.470, p<0.001) intake were significantly correlated with dft score. The negative association between frequency of milk consumption and dental caries was lost after other confounding factors were considered. Dental caries incidence was associated with age of subjects started brushing their teeth (Adjusted OR=5.46, 95% CI=1.74 - 17.17). There was no relationship between frequency of daily meals (p=0.800) and sugary food/drinks consumption (p=0.489) with dental caries occurrence. Conclusion: Dental caries is prevalent among young children and related with dietary factors and oral health practices. Therefore, healthy dietary habits and oral health practice should be integrated in the oral health promotion targeted to parents/caregivers and young children in order to improve their dental health status.

KW - Dental caries

KW - Dietary habits

KW - Sugary drinks

KW - Sugary foods

KW - Young children

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