Developing ASEAN green electricity in the context of the ASEAN community 2025

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Abstract

The Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN) represents an important region in Asia and the world. It consists of ten nations: Brunei, Cambodia, Indonesia, Lao People’s Democratic Republic (PDR), Malaysia, Myanmar, the Philippines, Thailand, Singapore and Viet Nam. ASEAN Member States have a combined market of more than 620 million people and have seen positive economic growth for many years, associated with different levels of economic development. With this vast intra-regional market, which attracts both domestic and foreign direct investors, ASEAN is gearing up towards a higher level of integration now called the ASEAN Community, which was declared at the 27th ASEAN Summit in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia in November 2015. Strong economic growth in ASEAN has resulted in high energy demand in the region. According to the fourth ASEAN Energy Outlook, in 2013, ASEAN accounted for about 8.5 per cent of the world population, consumed about 4.5 per cent of the world’s primary energy and was accountable for 5.7 per cent of total global energy production. As ASEAN economies are steadily expanding and its main energy indicators are below global averages, the fourth ASEAN Energy Outlook predicts that demand is expected to outstrip supply unless strong measures are taken to manage growth: this creates challenges regarding energy security and sustainable development. Few ASEAN Member States have so far been able to utilise new technologies to produce green electricity either for domestic consumption or for export. In developing green electricity, ASEAN Member States face many challenges relating to technology, raw materials, pricing, international trade law and environmental and sustainability concerns. This chapter examines the issues and challenges facing ASEAN Member States in ensuring that the ASEAN Member States fulfil the energy policy targets as part of the establishment of the ASEAN Community. Section B will examine the energy sources in ASEAN, before we turn to a discussion on green electricity and the ASEAN Community in Section C. This will be followed in Section D by an examination of the private sector-initiated and -funded green electricity projects in ASEAN Member States. Following this, the issues and challenges faced by ASEAN Member States in the implementation of green electricity projects are described in Section E. The chapter ends by drawing some conclusions.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationInternational Trade in Sustainable Electricity
Subtitle of host publicationRegulatory Challenges in International Economic Law
PublisherCambridge University Press
Pages138-155
Number of pages18
ISBN (Electronic)9781316681275
ISBN (Print)9781107163348
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jan 2017

Fingerprint

ASEAN
electricity
community
energy
Malaysia
economic growth
trade law
primary energy
Brunei
energy production
energy shortage
Laos
world population
energy policy
Myanmar
energy source
Cambodia
market

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Sciences(all)

Cite this

Jusoh, S. (2017). Developing ASEAN green electricity in the context of the ASEAN community 2025. In International Trade in Sustainable Electricity: Regulatory Challenges in International Economic Law (pp. 138-155). Cambridge University Press. https://doi.org/10.1017/9781316681275.009

Developing ASEAN green electricity in the context of the ASEAN community 2025. / Jusoh, Sufian.

International Trade in Sustainable Electricity: Regulatory Challenges in International Economic Law. Cambridge University Press, 2017. p. 138-155.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Jusoh, S 2017, Developing ASEAN green electricity in the context of the ASEAN community 2025. in International Trade in Sustainable Electricity: Regulatory Challenges in International Economic Law. Cambridge University Press, pp. 138-155. https://doi.org/10.1017/9781316681275.009
Jusoh S. Developing ASEAN green electricity in the context of the ASEAN community 2025. In International Trade in Sustainable Electricity: Regulatory Challenges in International Economic Law. Cambridge University Press. 2017. p. 138-155 https://doi.org/10.1017/9781316681275.009
Jusoh, Sufian. / Developing ASEAN green electricity in the context of the ASEAN community 2025. International Trade in Sustainable Electricity: Regulatory Challenges in International Economic Law. Cambridge University Press, 2017. pp. 138-155
@inbook{ec73fd4e035442c5a1a375fae6e69567,
title = "Developing ASEAN green electricity in the context of the ASEAN community 2025",
abstract = "The Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN) represents an important region in Asia and the world. It consists of ten nations: Brunei, Cambodia, Indonesia, Lao People’s Democratic Republic (PDR), Malaysia, Myanmar, the Philippines, Thailand, Singapore and Viet Nam. ASEAN Member States have a combined market of more than 620 million people and have seen positive economic growth for many years, associated with different levels of economic development. With this vast intra-regional market, which attracts both domestic and foreign direct investors, ASEAN is gearing up towards a higher level of integration now called the ASEAN Community, which was declared at the 27th ASEAN Summit in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia in November 2015. Strong economic growth in ASEAN has resulted in high energy demand in the region. According to the fourth ASEAN Energy Outlook, in 2013, ASEAN accounted for about 8.5 per cent of the world population, consumed about 4.5 per cent of the world’s primary energy and was accountable for 5.7 per cent of total global energy production. As ASEAN economies are steadily expanding and its main energy indicators are below global averages, the fourth ASEAN Energy Outlook predicts that demand is expected to outstrip supply unless strong measures are taken to manage growth: this creates challenges regarding energy security and sustainable development. Few ASEAN Member States have so far been able to utilise new technologies to produce green electricity either for domestic consumption or for export. In developing green electricity, ASEAN Member States face many challenges relating to technology, raw materials, pricing, international trade law and environmental and sustainability concerns. This chapter examines the issues and challenges facing ASEAN Member States in ensuring that the ASEAN Member States fulfil the energy policy targets as part of the establishment of the ASEAN Community. Section B will examine the energy sources in ASEAN, before we turn to a discussion on green electricity and the ASEAN Community in Section C. This will be followed in Section D by an examination of the private sector-initiated and -funded green electricity projects in ASEAN Member States. Following this, the issues and challenges faced by ASEAN Member States in the implementation of green electricity projects are described in Section E. The chapter ends by drawing some conclusions.",
author = "Sufian Jusoh",
year = "2017",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1017/9781316681275.009",
language = "English",
isbn = "9781107163348",
pages = "138--155",
booktitle = "International Trade in Sustainable Electricity",
publisher = "Cambridge University Press",

}

TY - CHAP

T1 - Developing ASEAN green electricity in the context of the ASEAN community 2025

AU - Jusoh, Sufian

PY - 2017/1/1

Y1 - 2017/1/1

N2 - The Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN) represents an important region in Asia and the world. It consists of ten nations: Brunei, Cambodia, Indonesia, Lao People’s Democratic Republic (PDR), Malaysia, Myanmar, the Philippines, Thailand, Singapore and Viet Nam. ASEAN Member States have a combined market of more than 620 million people and have seen positive economic growth for many years, associated with different levels of economic development. With this vast intra-regional market, which attracts both domestic and foreign direct investors, ASEAN is gearing up towards a higher level of integration now called the ASEAN Community, which was declared at the 27th ASEAN Summit in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia in November 2015. Strong economic growth in ASEAN has resulted in high energy demand in the region. According to the fourth ASEAN Energy Outlook, in 2013, ASEAN accounted for about 8.5 per cent of the world population, consumed about 4.5 per cent of the world’s primary energy and was accountable for 5.7 per cent of total global energy production. As ASEAN economies are steadily expanding and its main energy indicators are below global averages, the fourth ASEAN Energy Outlook predicts that demand is expected to outstrip supply unless strong measures are taken to manage growth: this creates challenges regarding energy security and sustainable development. Few ASEAN Member States have so far been able to utilise new technologies to produce green electricity either for domestic consumption or for export. In developing green electricity, ASEAN Member States face many challenges relating to technology, raw materials, pricing, international trade law and environmental and sustainability concerns. This chapter examines the issues and challenges facing ASEAN Member States in ensuring that the ASEAN Member States fulfil the energy policy targets as part of the establishment of the ASEAN Community. Section B will examine the energy sources in ASEAN, before we turn to a discussion on green electricity and the ASEAN Community in Section C. This will be followed in Section D by an examination of the private sector-initiated and -funded green electricity projects in ASEAN Member States. Following this, the issues and challenges faced by ASEAN Member States in the implementation of green electricity projects are described in Section E. The chapter ends by drawing some conclusions.

AB - The Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN) represents an important region in Asia and the world. It consists of ten nations: Brunei, Cambodia, Indonesia, Lao People’s Democratic Republic (PDR), Malaysia, Myanmar, the Philippines, Thailand, Singapore and Viet Nam. ASEAN Member States have a combined market of more than 620 million people and have seen positive economic growth for many years, associated with different levels of economic development. With this vast intra-regional market, which attracts both domestic and foreign direct investors, ASEAN is gearing up towards a higher level of integration now called the ASEAN Community, which was declared at the 27th ASEAN Summit in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia in November 2015. Strong economic growth in ASEAN has resulted in high energy demand in the region. According to the fourth ASEAN Energy Outlook, in 2013, ASEAN accounted for about 8.5 per cent of the world population, consumed about 4.5 per cent of the world’s primary energy and was accountable for 5.7 per cent of total global energy production. As ASEAN economies are steadily expanding and its main energy indicators are below global averages, the fourth ASEAN Energy Outlook predicts that demand is expected to outstrip supply unless strong measures are taken to manage growth: this creates challenges regarding energy security and sustainable development. Few ASEAN Member States have so far been able to utilise new technologies to produce green electricity either for domestic consumption or for export. In developing green electricity, ASEAN Member States face many challenges relating to technology, raw materials, pricing, international trade law and environmental and sustainability concerns. This chapter examines the issues and challenges facing ASEAN Member States in ensuring that the ASEAN Member States fulfil the energy policy targets as part of the establishment of the ASEAN Community. Section B will examine the energy sources in ASEAN, before we turn to a discussion on green electricity and the ASEAN Community in Section C. This will be followed in Section D by an examination of the private sector-initiated and -funded green electricity projects in ASEAN Member States. Following this, the issues and challenges faced by ASEAN Member States in the implementation of green electricity projects are described in Section E. The chapter ends by drawing some conclusions.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85048179431&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85048179431&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1017/9781316681275.009

DO - 10.1017/9781316681275.009

M3 - Chapter

AN - SCOPUS:85048179431

SN - 9781107163348

SP - 138

EP - 155

BT - International Trade in Sustainable Electricity

PB - Cambridge University Press

ER -