Determination of total arsenic in soil and arsenic-resistant bacteria from selected ground water in Kandal Province, Cambodia

A. Hamzah, K. K. Wong, F. N. Hasan, S. Mustafa, Khoo Kok Siong Kok Siong, Sukiman Sarmani

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Cambodia has geological environments conducive to generation of high-arsenic groundwater and people are at high risk of chronic arsenic exposure. The aims of this study are to investigate the concentration of total arsenic and to isolate and identify arsenic-resistant bacteria from selected locations in Kandal Province, Cambodia. The INAA technique was used to measure the concentration of total arsenic in soils. The arsenic concentrations in soils were above permissible 5 mg/kg, ranging from 5.34 to 27.81 mg/kg. Bacteria resistant to arsenic from two arsenic-contaminated wells in Preak Russey were isolated by enrichment method in nutrient broth (NB). Colonies isolated from NB was then grown on minimal salt media (MSM) added with arsenic at increasing concentrations of 10, 20, 30, 50, 100 and 250 ppm. Two isolates that can tolerate 750 ppm of arsenic were identified as Enterobacter agglomerans and Acinetobacter lwoffii based on a series of biochemical, physiological and morphological analysis. Optimum growth of both isolates ranged from pH 6.6 to 7.0 and 30-35 C. E. agglomerans and A. lwoffii were able to remove 66.4 and 64.1 % of arsenic, respectively at the initial concentration of 750 ppm, within 72 h of incubation. Using energy dispersive X-ray technique, the percentage of arsenic absorbed by E. agglomerans and A. lwoffii was 0.09 and 0.15 %, respectively. This study suggested that arsenic-resistant E. agglomerans and A. lwoffii removed arsenic from media due to their ability to absorb arsenic.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)291-296
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Radioanalytical and Nuclear Chemistry
Volume297
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Aug 2013

Fingerprint

Cambodia
Groundwater
Arsenic
Bacteria
Soil
Soils
Nutrients
Food
Enterobacter
Acinetobacter

Keywords

  • Arsenic
  • Bacteria
  • Bioremediation
  • Removal
  • Resistance

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging
  • Spectroscopy
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Pollution
  • Health, Toxicology and Mutagenesis
  • Nuclear Energy and Engineering
  • Analytical Chemistry

Cite this

Determination of total arsenic in soil and arsenic-resistant bacteria from selected ground water in Kandal Province, Cambodia. / Hamzah, A.; Wong, K. K.; Hasan, F. N.; Mustafa, S.; Kok Siong, Khoo Kok Siong; Sarmani, Sukiman.

In: Journal of Radioanalytical and Nuclear Chemistry, Vol. 297, No. 2, 08.2013, p. 291-296.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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