Detection of a katabatic wind event with GPS meteorology measurements at Scott Base Antarctica

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Abstract

A katabatic wind event which dramatically affects the polar climate has been detected using GPS meteorology measurements. GPS-derived precipitable water vapor (GPS PWV) variability and its relation to a katabatic event at Scott Base station, Antarctica was investigated. The investigations using the data gathered from 21 to 30 November of 2002. They showed that the water vapor profile exhibited an irregular pattern with a maximum PWV of 7.38 mm (~6 mm on average). This event was strongly influenced by relative humidity than by wind speed activity. The dominant wind flow during this period was from the North to Northeast (blowing from the Ross Sea) with a mean speed of 3.79 ms -1. The PWV increased when the temperature was between -15 and -11°C. During the katabatic event identified between 21:30 UT of 28 November and 18:40 UT on 29 November, the wind blew from the Southeast to South direction (from the Ross Ice Shelf) with a maximum speed of 10.92 ms -1. The PWV increased ~1.0 mm (23%) from the mean value accompanied by severe wind had pronounced effect on GPS observations.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)153-162
Number of pages10
JournalMeteorology and Atmospheric Physics
Volume115
Issue number3-4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Feb 2012

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meteorology
GPS
water vapor
precipitable water
ice shelf
relative humidity
wind velocity
detection
Antarctica
climate
temperature
speed

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Atmospheric Science

Cite this

Detection of a katabatic wind event with GPS meteorology measurements at Scott Base Antarctica. / Suparta, Wayan.

In: Meteorology and Atmospheric Physics, Vol. 115, No. 3-4, 02.2012, p. 153-162.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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