Depression and anxiety among traumatic brain injury patients in Malaysia

Mohammad Farris Iman Leong Bin Abdullah, Yin Ping Ng, Hatta Sidi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Depression and anxiety are common psychiatric sequelae of traumatic brain injury (TBI). However, there is lack of data on comorbid depression and anxiety, and depression and anxiety in TBI patients were often evaluated using non-validated diagnostic tools. This study aims to determine the rates, their comorbidity, and factors associated with depressive and anxiety disorders in TBI patients. Methods: In this cross-sectional study, 101 TBI patients were interviewed using the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV Axis I Disorders to assess the rates of depressive and anxiety disorders after TBI. The association of socio-demographic and clinical factors with depressive and anxiety disorders were determined using Pearson's Chi-Square test. Results: A total of 25% of TBI patients (n = 25/101) were diagnosed with depressive disorders, of which 15% had major depressive disorder (n = 15/101) and 10% had minor depression (n = 10/101). Fourteen percent of TBI patients had anxiety disorders (n = 14/101), of which post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) was the commonest anxiety disorder (9%, n = 9/101). Seven percent of TBI patients (n = 7/101) had comorbid depressive and anxiety disorders. The only factor associated with depressive disorder was the duration of TBI (≥ 1 year) while the only factor associated with anxiety disorder was the mechanism of trauma (assault). Conclusion: Major depressive disorder, minor depression and PTSD are common psychiatric complications of TBI. Clinicians should screen for depressive and anxiety disorders in TBI patients, particularly those with ≥1 year of injury and had sustained TBI from assault.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)67-70
Number of pages4
JournalAsian Journal of Psychiatry
Volume37
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Oct 2018

Fingerprint

Malaysia
Anxiety
Depression
Anxiety Disorders
Depressive Disorder
Major Depressive Disorder
Post-Traumatic Stress Disorders
Psychiatry
Traumatic Brain Injury
Wounds and Injuries
Chi-Square Distribution
Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders
Comorbidity
Cross-Sectional Studies
Demography
Interviews

Keywords

  • Anxiety disorders
  • Comorbid depression and anxiety
  • Depressive disorders
  • Malaysia
  • Traumatic brain injury

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychology(all)
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

Depression and anxiety among traumatic brain injury patients in Malaysia. / Leong Bin Abdullah, Mohammad Farris Iman; Ng, Yin Ping; Sidi, Hatta.

In: Asian Journal of Psychiatry, Vol. 37, 01.10.2018, p. 67-70.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Leong Bin Abdullah, Mohammad Farris Iman ; Ng, Yin Ping ; Sidi, Hatta. / Depression and anxiety among traumatic brain injury patients in Malaysia. In: Asian Journal of Psychiatry. 2018 ; Vol. 37. pp. 67-70.
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