Dementia: An Overview of Risk Factors

Ramesh Sahathevan

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

The prevalence of dementia will increase dramatically in the coming decades. Current therapy is limited to pharmacological and nonpharmacological interventions that afford symptomatic relief at best. To enable prevention, we first need to identify possible risk factors that increase the chances of developing dementia. The most accepted and prevalent risk factor for dementia is aging. Research has provided conclusive evidence that midlife onset of other vascular risk factors like hypertension, diabetes mellitus, and hyperlipidemia increases the risk of dementia in later life. Other factors such as cigarette smoking, elevated plasma homocysteine, and atrial fibrillation are also implicated in increasing the risk of dementia. Certain risk factor combinations have a synergistic effect on the incidence of dementia, especially in individuals who are ApoEε4 positive. Although rare, inherited dementias have been invaluable in increasing our understanding of the disease down to a genetic level. Determination of risk factors will provide insight into the disease process and allow for the implementation of risk stratification therapies, which hopefully will result in a lower incidence of dementia.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationDiet and Nutrition in Dementia and Cognitive Decline
PublisherElsevier Inc.
Pages187-198
Number of pages12
ISBN (Print)9780124079397, 9780124078246
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 18 Nov 2014

Fingerprint

Dementia
Apolipoprotein E4
Incidence
Homocysteine
Hyperlipidemias
Atrial Fibrillation
Diabetes Mellitus
Smoking
Pharmacology
Hypertension
Therapeutics
Research

Keywords

  • Aging
  • ApoEε4
  • Atrial fibrillation
  • Dementia
  • Diabetes
  • Homocysteine
  • Hyperlipidemia
  • Hypertension
  • Inherited
  • Risk factors
  • Smoking

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Nursing(all)

Cite this

Sahathevan, R. (2014). Dementia: An Overview of Risk Factors. In Diet and Nutrition in Dementia and Cognitive Decline (pp. 187-198). Elsevier Inc.. https://doi.org/10.1016/B978-0-12-407824-6.00018-5

Dementia : An Overview of Risk Factors. / Sahathevan, Ramesh.

Diet and Nutrition in Dementia and Cognitive Decline. Elsevier Inc., 2014. p. 187-198.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Sahathevan, R 2014, Dementia: An Overview of Risk Factors. in Diet and Nutrition in Dementia and Cognitive Decline. Elsevier Inc., pp. 187-198. https://doi.org/10.1016/B978-0-12-407824-6.00018-5
Sahathevan R. Dementia: An Overview of Risk Factors. In Diet and Nutrition in Dementia and Cognitive Decline. Elsevier Inc. 2014. p. 187-198 https://doi.org/10.1016/B978-0-12-407824-6.00018-5
Sahathevan, Ramesh. / Dementia : An Overview of Risk Factors. Diet and Nutrition in Dementia and Cognitive Decline. Elsevier Inc., 2014. pp. 187-198
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