Delivery of enteral nutrition for critically ill children

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

Aim: Optimal nutrition support is important in the care of critically ill children as they are at higher risk of malnutrition and have a higher incidence of complications and mortality. The aim of this study was to review the delivery of enteral feeding to critically ill paediatric patients in the Paediatric Intensive Care Unit in a tertiary hospital in Malaysia. Methods: This cross-sectional study was conducted in 53 subjects (30 males and 23 females) who were recruited on the day of admission and remained in the study until they were discharged, deceased or for a maximum of 14 days of Paediatric Intensive Care Unit stay. The median age of subjects was 10.2 (interquartile range 5.1-50.5) months old. Results: Enteral nutrition was initiated within 21.0 (interquartile range 5.3-33.8) hours after admission and was interrupted in 66% of patients during the study, with a median duration of 11.5 (interquartile range 6.1-28.3) hours for each patient. The overall duration of enteral feeding interruptions was 20% of the total feeding time. The main reasons for interruptions were medical procedures (55%) and non-gastrointestinal complications (27%). Twenty-two (43.2%) of the patients were malnourished when admitted to the Paediatric Intensive Care Unit. The feeding initiation time, referral to the dietitian, and the frequency and duration of feeding interruptions were all positively associated with cumulative energy and protein deficits. Conclusions: Malnutrition among critically ill children in the Paediatric Intensive Care Unit was prevalent; energy and protein deficits were substantial. Strategies to improve the delivery of nutritional support to this group of patients should be planned and implemented by multidisciplinary clinical teams.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)120-125
Number of pages6
JournalNutrition and Dietetics
Volume70
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jun 2013

Fingerprint

Enteral Nutrition
Pediatric Intensive Care Units
Critical Illness
Malnutrition
Nutritionists
Nutritional Support
Malaysia
Tertiary Care Centers
Proteins
Referral and Consultation
Cross-Sectional Studies
Pediatrics
Mortality
Incidence

Keywords

  • Children
  • Critically ill
  • Enteral nutrition
  • Malnutrition
  • Paediatric intensive care unit

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Nutrition and Dietetics

Cite this

Delivery of enteral nutrition for critically ill children. / Abdul Manaf, Zahara; Kassim, Norasimah; Hamzaid, Nur Hana; Razalli, Nurul Huda.

In: Nutrition and Dietetics, Vol. 70, No. 2, 06.2013, p. 120-125.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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