Decellularization and genipin crosslinking of amniotic membrane suitable for tissue engineering applications

Sarumathi Gobinathan, Siti Solehah Zainol, Siti Fatmah Azizi, Nabil Mohamad Iman, Rajasegaran Muniandy, Hanis Nazihah Hasmad, Mohd Reusmaazran bin Yusof, Salina Husain, Haslinda Abd Aziz, Lokanathan Yogeswaran

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Amniotic membrane has the potential to be used as scaffold in various tissue engineering applications. However, increasing its biostability at the same time maintaining its biocompatibility is important to enhance its usage as a scaffold. This studied characteristics genipin-crosslinked amniotic membrane as a bioscaffold. Redundant human amniotic membranes (HAM) divided into native (nAM), decellularized (dAM) and genipin-crosslinked (clAM) groups. The dAM and clAM group were decellularized using thermolysin (TL) and sodium hydroxide (NaOH) solution. Next, clAM group was crosslinked with 0.5% and 1.0% (w/v) genipin. The HAM was then studied for in vitro degradation, percentage of swelling, optical clarity, ultrastructure and mechanical strength. Meanwhile, fibroblasts isolated from nasal turbinates were then seeded onto nAM, dAM and clAM for biocompatibility studies. clAM had the slowest degradation rate and were still morphologically intact after 30 days of incubation in 0.01% collagenase type 1 solution. The dAM had a significantly highest percentage of swelling than other groups (p < 0.05). Besides, the dAM retained the collagen content at similar level of nAM. Although the dAM had highest mechanical strength compared to the rest of the groups, the differences were statistically insignificant. Cell attachment on dAM and 0.5% clAM was higher compared to that on nAM and 1.0% clAM. In conclusion, clAM have better biostability and biocompatibility compared to the nAM and dAM. Together with other suitable characteristics of the clAM such as percentage of swelling, structural integrity and ECM content, clAM is suitable as scaffold for various tissue engineering applications.

Original languageEnglish
JournalJournal of Biomaterials Science, Polymer Edition
DOIs
Publication statusAccepted/In press - 1 Jan 2018

Fingerprint

Amnion
Bivalvia
Tissue Engineering
Tissue engineering
Crosslinking
Biocompatibility
Membranes
Swelling
Scaffolds (biology)
Strength of materials
Thermolysin
Military electronic countermeasures
Degradation
Sodium Hydroxide
Bioelectric potentials
Structural integrity
Fibroblasts
Collagen
Scaffolds
Sodium

Keywords

  • Amniotic membrane
  • fibroblast
  • genipin
  • scaffold
  • tissue regeneration

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biophysics
  • Bioengineering
  • Biomaterials
  • Biomedical Engineering

Cite this

Decellularization and genipin crosslinking of amniotic membrane suitable for tissue engineering applications. / Gobinathan, Sarumathi; Zainol, Siti Solehah; Azizi, Siti Fatmah; Iman, Nabil Mohamad; Muniandy, Rajasegaran; Hasmad, Hanis Nazihah; Yusof, Mohd Reusmaazran bin; Husain, Salina; Abd Aziz, Haslinda; Yogeswaran, Lokanathan.

In: Journal of Biomaterials Science, Polymer Edition, 01.01.2018.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Gobinathan, Sarumathi ; Zainol, Siti Solehah ; Azizi, Siti Fatmah ; Iman, Nabil Mohamad ; Muniandy, Rajasegaran ; Hasmad, Hanis Nazihah ; Yusof, Mohd Reusmaazran bin ; Husain, Salina ; Abd Aziz, Haslinda ; Yogeswaran, Lokanathan. / Decellularization and genipin crosslinking of amniotic membrane suitable for tissue engineering applications. In: Journal of Biomaterials Science, Polymer Edition. 2018.
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abstract = "Amniotic membrane has the potential to be used as scaffold in various tissue engineering applications. However, increasing its biostability at the same time maintaining its biocompatibility is important to enhance its usage as a scaffold. This studied characteristics genipin-crosslinked amniotic membrane as a bioscaffold. Redundant human amniotic membranes (HAM) divided into native (nAM), decellularized (dAM) and genipin-crosslinked (clAM) groups. The dAM and clAM group were decellularized using thermolysin (TL) and sodium hydroxide (NaOH) solution. Next, clAM group was crosslinked with 0.5{\%} and 1.0{\%} (w/v) genipin. The HAM was then studied for in vitro degradation, percentage of swelling, optical clarity, ultrastructure and mechanical strength. Meanwhile, fibroblasts isolated from nasal turbinates were then seeded onto nAM, dAM and clAM for biocompatibility studies. clAM had the slowest degradation rate and were still morphologically intact after 30 days of incubation in 0.01{\%} collagenase type 1 solution. The dAM had a significantly highest percentage of swelling than other groups (p < 0.05). Besides, the dAM retained the collagen content at similar level of nAM. Although the dAM had highest mechanical strength compared to the rest of the groups, the differences were statistically insignificant. Cell attachment on dAM and 0.5{\%} clAM was higher compared to that on nAM and 1.0{\%} clAM. In conclusion, clAM have better biostability and biocompatibility compared to the nAM and dAM. Together with other suitable characteristics of the clAM such as percentage of swelling, structural integrity and ECM content, clAM is suitable as scaffold for various tissue engineering applications.",
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AU - Gobinathan, Sarumathi

AU - Zainol, Siti Solehah

AU - Azizi, Siti Fatmah

AU - Iman, Nabil Mohamad

AU - Muniandy, Rajasegaran

AU - Hasmad, Hanis Nazihah

AU - Yusof, Mohd Reusmaazran bin

AU - Husain, Salina

AU - Abd Aziz, Haslinda

AU - Yogeswaran, Lokanathan

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