Cytotoxic evaluation of biomechanically improved crosslinked ovine collagen on human dermal fibroblasts

M. A. Amri, M. A B Firdaus, M. B. Fauzi, S. R. Chowdhury, N. R. Fadilah, W. K. Wan Hamirul, M. Y. Reusmaazran, B. S. Aminuddin, B. H I Ruszymah

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

26 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Earlier studies in our laboratory demonstrated that collagen extracted from ovine tendon is biocompatible towards human dermal fibroblast. To be able to use this collagen as a scaffold in skin tissue engineering, a mechanically stronger scaffold is required that can withstand manipulation before transplantation. This study was conducted to improve the mechanical strength of this collagen sponge using chemical crosslinkers, and evaluate their effect on physical, chemical and biocompatible properties. Collagen sponge was crosslinked with 1-ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl) carbodiimide (EDC) and glutaraldehyde (GA). Tensile test, FTIR study and mercury porosimetry were used to evaluate mechanical properties, chemical property and porosity, respectively. MTT assay was performed to evaluate the cytotoxic effect of crosslinked collagen sponge on human dermal fibroblasts. The FTIR study confirmed the successful crosslinking of collagen sponge. Crosslinking with EDC and GA significantly increased the mechanical strength of collagen sponge, with GA being more superior. Crosslinking of collagen sponge significantly reduced the porosity and the effect was predominant in GA-crosslinked collagen sponge. The GA-crosslinked collagen showed significantly lower, 60% cell viability towards human dermal fibroblasts compared to that of EDC-crosslinked collagen, 80% and non-crosslinked collagen, 100%. Although the mechanical strength was better when using GA but the more toxic effect on dermal fibroblast makes EDC a more suitable crosslinker for future skin tissue engineering.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1715-1724
Number of pages10
JournalBio-Medical Materials and Engineering
Volume24
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2014

Fingerprint

Fibroblasts
Collagen
Sheep
Porifera
Skin
Glutaral
Crosslinking
Strength of materials
Porosity
Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy
Tissue Engineering
Scaffolds (biology)
Tissue engineering
Ethyldimethylaminopropyl Carbodiimide
Poisons
Tendons
Mercury
Chemical properties
Assays
Cell Survival

Keywords

  • collagen
  • crosslinked
  • human dermal fibroblast
  • Tissue engineering

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biomedical Engineering
  • Biomaterials
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Cytotoxic evaluation of biomechanically improved crosslinked ovine collagen on human dermal fibroblasts. / Amri, M. A.; Firdaus, M. A B; Fauzi, M. B.; Chowdhury, S. R.; Fadilah, N. R.; Wan Hamirul, W. K.; Reusmaazran, M. Y.; Aminuddin, B. S.; Ruszymah, B. H I.

In: Bio-Medical Materials and Engineering, Vol. 24, No. 4, 2014, p. 1715-1724.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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