Cyber terrorism challenges: The need for a global response to a multi-jurisdictional crime

Pardis Moslemzadeh Tehrani, Nazura Abdul Manap, Hossein Taji

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

14 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

With the widespread concerns about cyber terrorism and the frequent use of the term "cyber terrorism" at the present time, many international organisations have made efforts to combat this threat. Since cyber terrorism is an international crime, local regulations alone are not able to defend against such attacks; they require a transnational response. Therefore, an attacked country will invoke international law to seek justice for any damage caused, through the exercise of universal jurisdiction. Without the aid of international organisations, it is difficult to prevent cyber terrorism. At the same time, international organisations determine which state court, or international court, has the authority to settle a dispute. The objective of this paper is to analyse and review the effectiveness and sufficiency of the current global responses to cyber terrorism through the exercise of international jurisdiction. This article also touches upon the notion of cyber terrorism as a transnational crime and an international threat; thus, national regulations alone cannot prevent it. The need for an international organisation to prevent and defend nations from cyber terrorism attacks is pressing. This paper finds that, as cyber terrorism is a transnational crime, it should be subjected to universal jurisdiction through multinational cooperation, and this would be the most suitable method to counter future transnational crimes such as cyber terrorism.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)207-215
Number of pages9
JournalComputer Law and Security Review
Volume29
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jun 2013

Fingerprint

Terrorism
Crime
terrorism
offense
jurisdiction
International law
threat
Cyberterrorism
regulation
international law
damages
justice
International organizations
present

Keywords

  • Cyber security
  • Cyber terrorism
  • Cyber threats
  • Cybercrime
  • European Convention on
  • Transnational crime

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Computer Networks and Communications
  • Business, Management and Accounting(all)
  • Law

Cite this

Cyber terrorism challenges : The need for a global response to a multi-jurisdictional crime. / Tehrani, Pardis Moslemzadeh; Abdul Manap, Nazura; Taji, Hossein.

In: Computer Law and Security Review, Vol. 29, No. 3, 06.2013, p. 207-215.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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