Current status of arsenic exposure and social implication in the Mekong River basin of Cambodia

Kongkea Phan, Kyoung Woong Kim, Laingshun Huoy, Samrach Phan, Soknim Se, Anthony Guy Capon, Jamal Hisham Hashim

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    3 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    To evaluate the current status of arsenic exposure in the Mekong River basin of Cambodia, field interview along with urine sample collection was conducted in the arsenic-affected area of Kandal Province, Cambodia. Urine samples were analyzed for total arsenic concentrations by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. As a result, arsenicosis patients (n = 127) had As in urine (UAs) ranging from 3.76 to 373 µg L<sup>−1</sup> (mean = 78.7 ± 69.8 µg L<sup>−1</sup>; median = 60.2 µg L<sup>−1</sup>). Asymptomatic villagers (n = 108) had UAs ranging from 5.93 to 312 µg L<sup>−1</sup> (mean = 73.0 ± 52.2 µg L<sup>−1</sup>; median = 60.5 µg L<sup>−1</sup>). About 24.7 % of all participants had UAs greater than 100 µg L<sup>−1</sup> which indicated a recent arsenic exposure. A survey found that females and adults were more likely to be diagnosed with skin sign of arsenicosis than males and children, respectively. Education level, age, gender, groundwater drinking period, residence time in the village and amount of water drunk per day may influence the incidence of skin signs of arsenicosis. This study suggests that residents in Kandal study area are currently at risk of arsenic although some mitigation has been implemented. More commitment should be made to address this public health concern in rural Cambodia.

    Original languageEnglish
    JournalEnvironmental Geochemistry and Health
    DOIs
    Publication statusAccepted/In press - 23 Aug 2015

    Fingerprint

    Arsenic
    Catchments
    arsenic
    river basin
    Rivers
    urine
    skin
    Skin
    Inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry
    Public health
    drinking
    public health
    Groundwater
    residence time
    gender
    mitigation
    village
    mass spectrometry
    Education
    exposure

    Keywords

    • Arsenic
    • Arsenicosis patient
    • Asymptomatic villager
    • Cambodia
    • Social implication
    • Urine

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Environmental Engineering
    • Environmental Science(all)
    • Environmental Chemistry
    • Water Science and Technology
    • Geochemistry and Petrology

    Cite this

    Current status of arsenic exposure and social implication in the Mekong River basin of Cambodia. / Phan, Kongkea; Kim, Kyoung Woong; Huoy, Laingshun; Phan, Samrach; Se, Soknim; Capon, Anthony Guy; Hashim, Jamal Hisham.

    In: Environmental Geochemistry and Health, 23.08.2015.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Phan, Kongkea ; Kim, Kyoung Woong ; Huoy, Laingshun ; Phan, Samrach ; Se, Soknim ; Capon, Anthony Guy ; Hashim, Jamal Hisham. / Current status of arsenic exposure and social implication in the Mekong River basin of Cambodia. In: Environmental Geochemistry and Health. 2015.
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