Current state and future prospects of direct-to-consumer pharmacogenetics

Eng Wee Chua, M. A. Kennedy

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

26 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Direct-to-consumer (DTC) DNA testing has grown from contentious beginnings into a global industry, by providing a wide range of personal genomic information directly to its clients. These companies, typified by the well-established 23 and Me, generally carry out a gene-chip analysis of single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) using DNA extracted from a saliva sample. These genetic data are then assimilated and provided direct to the client, with varying degrees of interpretation. Although much debate has focused on the limitations and ethical aspects of providing genotypes for disease risk alleles, the provision of phar-macogenetic results by DTC companies is less studied. We set out to evaluate current DTC pharmacogenetics offerings, and then to consider how these services might best evolve and adapt in order to play a potentially useful future role in delivery of personalized medicine.

Original languageEnglish
Article numberArticle 152
JournalFrontiers in Pharmacology
Volume3 AUG
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2012

Fingerprint

Pharmacogenetics
Precision Medicine
DNA
Oligonucleotide Array Sequence Analysis
Saliva
Single Nucleotide Polymorphism
Industry
Alleles
Genotype
Direct-To-Consumer Screening and Testing

Keywords

  • Direct-to-consumer
  • Personal genome
  • Personalized medicine
  • Pharmacogenetics
  • Pharmacogenomics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pharmacology (medical)
  • Pharmacology

Cite this

Current state and future prospects of direct-to-consumer pharmacogenetics. / Chua, Eng Wee; Kennedy, M. A.

In: Frontiers in Pharmacology, Vol. 3 AUG, Article 152, 2012.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{c6e026b583544303b59acbf995b4ac53,
title = "Current state and future prospects of direct-to-consumer pharmacogenetics",
abstract = "Direct-to-consumer (DTC) DNA testing has grown from contentious beginnings into a global industry, by providing a wide range of personal genomic information directly to its clients. These companies, typified by the well-established 23 and Me, generally carry out a gene-chip analysis of single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) using DNA extracted from a saliva sample. These genetic data are then assimilated and provided direct to the client, with varying degrees of interpretation. Although much debate has focused on the limitations and ethical aspects of providing genotypes for disease risk alleles, the provision of phar-macogenetic results by DTC companies is less studied. We set out to evaluate current DTC pharmacogenetics offerings, and then to consider how these services might best evolve and adapt in order to play a potentially useful future role in delivery of personalized medicine.",
keywords = "Direct-to-consumer, Personal genome, Personalized medicine, Pharmacogenetics, Pharmacogenomics",
author = "Chua, {Eng Wee} and Kennedy, {M. A.}",
year = "2012",
doi = "10.3389/fphar.2012.00152",
language = "English",
volume = "3 AUG",
journal = "Frontiers in Pharmacology",
issn = "1663-9812",
publisher = "Frontiers Media S. A.",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Current state and future prospects of direct-to-consumer pharmacogenetics

AU - Chua, Eng Wee

AU - Kennedy, M. A.

PY - 2012

Y1 - 2012

N2 - Direct-to-consumer (DTC) DNA testing has grown from contentious beginnings into a global industry, by providing a wide range of personal genomic information directly to its clients. These companies, typified by the well-established 23 and Me, generally carry out a gene-chip analysis of single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) using DNA extracted from a saliva sample. These genetic data are then assimilated and provided direct to the client, with varying degrees of interpretation. Although much debate has focused on the limitations and ethical aspects of providing genotypes for disease risk alleles, the provision of phar-macogenetic results by DTC companies is less studied. We set out to evaluate current DTC pharmacogenetics offerings, and then to consider how these services might best evolve and adapt in order to play a potentially useful future role in delivery of personalized medicine.

AB - Direct-to-consumer (DTC) DNA testing has grown from contentious beginnings into a global industry, by providing a wide range of personal genomic information directly to its clients. These companies, typified by the well-established 23 and Me, generally carry out a gene-chip analysis of single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) using DNA extracted from a saliva sample. These genetic data are then assimilated and provided direct to the client, with varying degrees of interpretation. Although much debate has focused on the limitations and ethical aspects of providing genotypes for disease risk alleles, the provision of phar-macogenetic results by DTC companies is less studied. We set out to evaluate current DTC pharmacogenetics offerings, and then to consider how these services might best evolve and adapt in order to play a potentially useful future role in delivery of personalized medicine.

KW - Direct-to-consumer

KW - Personal genome

KW - Personalized medicine

KW - Pharmacogenetics

KW - Pharmacogenomics

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84866156660&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84866156660&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.3389/fphar.2012.00152

DO - 10.3389/fphar.2012.00152

M3 - Article

VL - 3 AUG

JO - Frontiers in Pharmacology

JF - Frontiers in Pharmacology

SN - 1663-9812

M1 - Article 152

ER -