Cross-Situational Self-Consistency in Nine Cultures: The Importance of Separating Influences of Social Norms and Distinctive Dispositions

Kenneth D. Locke, A. Timothy Church, Khairul Anwar @ Johari Mastor, Guy J. Curtis, Pamela Sadler, Kelly McDonald, José de Jesús Vargas-Flores, Joselina Ibáñez-Reyes, Hiroaki Morio, Jose Alberto S. Reyes, Helena F. Cabrera, Rina Mazuera Arias, Brigida Carolina Rincon, Neida Coromoto Albornoz Arias, Arturo Muñoz, Fernando A. Ortiz

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

We assessed self-consistency (expressing similar traits in different situations) by having undergraduates in the United States (n = 230), Australia (n = 220), Canada (n = 240), Ecuador (n = 101), Mexico (n = 209), Venezuela (n = 209), Japan (n = 178), Malaysia (n = 254), and the Philippines (n = 241) report the traits they expressed in four different social situations. Self-consistency was positively associated with age, well-being, living in Latin America, and not living in Japan; however, each of these variables showed a unique pattern of associations with various psychologically distinct sources of raw self-consistency, including cross-situationally consistent social norms and injunctions. For example, low consistency between injunctive norms and trait expressions fully explained the low self-consistency in Japan. In accord with trait theory, after removing normative and injunctive sources of consistency, there remained robust distinctive noninjunctive self-consistency (reflecting individuating personality dispositions) in every country, including Japan. The results highlight how clarifying the determinants and implications of self-consistency requires differentiating its distinctive, injunctive, and noninjunctive components.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1033-1049
Number of pages17
JournalPersonality and Social Psychology Bulletin
Volume43
Issue number7
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jul 2017

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Japan
Ecuador
Venezuela
Philippines
Latin America
Malaysia
Mexico
Canada
Personality
Social Norms

Keywords

  • culture
  • distinctive
  • norms
  • self-consistency
  • well-being

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Psychology

Cite this

Cross-Situational Self-Consistency in Nine Cultures : The Importance of Separating Influences of Social Norms and Distinctive Dispositions. / Locke, Kenneth D.; Church, A. Timothy; Mastor, Khairul Anwar @ Johari; Curtis, Guy J.; Sadler, Pamela; McDonald, Kelly; Vargas-Flores, José de Jesús; Ibáñez-Reyes, Joselina; Morio, Hiroaki; Reyes, Jose Alberto S.; Cabrera, Helena F.; Mazuera Arias, Rina; Rincon, Brigida Carolina; Albornoz Arias, Neida Coromoto; Muñoz, Arturo; Ortiz, Fernando A.

In: Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, Vol. 43, No. 7, 01.07.2017, p. 1033-1049.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Locke, KD, Church, AT, Mastor, KAJ, Curtis, GJ, Sadler, P, McDonald, K, Vargas-Flores, JDJ, Ibáñez-Reyes, J, Morio, H, Reyes, JAS, Cabrera, HF, Mazuera Arias, R, Rincon, BC, Albornoz Arias, NC, Muñoz, A & Ortiz, FA 2017, 'Cross-Situational Self-Consistency in Nine Cultures: The Importance of Separating Influences of Social Norms and Distinctive Dispositions', Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, vol. 43, no. 7, pp. 1033-1049. https://doi.org/10.1177/0146167217704192
Locke, Kenneth D. ; Church, A. Timothy ; Mastor, Khairul Anwar @ Johari ; Curtis, Guy J. ; Sadler, Pamela ; McDonald, Kelly ; Vargas-Flores, José de Jesús ; Ibáñez-Reyes, Joselina ; Morio, Hiroaki ; Reyes, Jose Alberto S. ; Cabrera, Helena F. ; Mazuera Arias, Rina ; Rincon, Brigida Carolina ; Albornoz Arias, Neida Coromoto ; Muñoz, Arturo ; Ortiz, Fernando A. / Cross-Situational Self-Consistency in Nine Cultures : The Importance of Separating Influences of Social Norms and Distinctive Dispositions. In: Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin. 2017 ; Vol. 43, No. 7. pp. 1033-1049.
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