Critical incident monitoring in anaesthesia

Choy Yin Choy

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    23 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    Purpose of review Updates on developments in critical incident monitoring in anaesthesia, and assesses its role in improving patient safety. Recent findings Critical incident reporting has become more widely accepted as an effective way to improve anaesthetic safety, and has continued to highlight the importance of human errors and system failures. The establishment of an international database also improves critical incident reporting. Experiences from the national reporting and learning system in the UK have provided some solutions to the many problems and criticisms faced by the critical incident reporting technique. Direct observations to detect errors are more accurate than voluntary reporting of critical incidents, and may be a promising new approach. Summary Critical incident monitoring is a valuable tool in ensuring patient safety due to its low cost and the ability to provide a comprehensive body of detailed qualitative information. The qualitative information gathered can be used to develop strategies to prevent and manage existing problems, as well as to plan further initiatives for patient safety. Novel approaches should complement existing methods to achieve better results. The development of a culture which emphasises safety should go hand in hand with current audit activities.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)183-186
    Number of pages4
    JournalCurrent Opinion in Anaesthesiology
    Volume21
    Issue number2
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - Apr 2008

    Fingerprint

    Risk Management
    Patient Safety
    Anesthesia
    Safety
    Aptitude
    Task Performance and Analysis
    Anesthetics
    Learning
    Databases
    Costs and Cost Analysis

    Keywords

    • Anaesthesia
    • Critical incident
    • Patient safety
    • Reporting

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine

    Cite this

    Critical incident monitoring in anaesthesia. / Choy, Choy Yin.

    In: Current Opinion in Anaesthesiology, Vol. 21, No. 2, 04.2008, p. 183-186.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Choy, Choy Yin. / Critical incident monitoring in anaesthesia. In: Current Opinion in Anaesthesiology. 2008 ; Vol. 21, No. 2. pp. 183-186.
    @article{5b61e2c2500b4cc8801f88c77d3c1be5,
    title = "Critical incident monitoring in anaesthesia",
    abstract = "Purpose of review Updates on developments in critical incident monitoring in anaesthesia, and assesses its role in improving patient safety. Recent findings Critical incident reporting has become more widely accepted as an effective way to improve anaesthetic safety, and has continued to highlight the importance of human errors and system failures. The establishment of an international database also improves critical incident reporting. Experiences from the national reporting and learning system in the UK have provided some solutions to the many problems and criticisms faced by the critical incident reporting technique. Direct observations to detect errors are more accurate than voluntary reporting of critical incidents, and may be a promising new approach. Summary Critical incident monitoring is a valuable tool in ensuring patient safety due to its low cost and the ability to provide a comprehensive body of detailed qualitative information. The qualitative information gathered can be used to develop strategies to prevent and manage existing problems, as well as to plan further initiatives for patient safety. Novel approaches should complement existing methods to achieve better results. The development of a culture which emphasises safety should go hand in hand with current audit activities.",
    keywords = "Anaesthesia, Critical incident, Patient safety, Reporting",
    author = "Choy, {Choy Yin}",
    year = "2008",
    month = "4",
    doi = "10.1097/ACO.0b013e3282f33592",
    language = "English",
    volume = "21",
    pages = "183--186",
    journal = "Current Opinion in Anaesthesiology",
    issn = "0952-7907",
    publisher = "Lippincott Williams and Wilkins",
    number = "2",

    }

    TY - JOUR

    T1 - Critical incident monitoring in anaesthesia

    AU - Choy, Choy Yin

    PY - 2008/4

    Y1 - 2008/4

    N2 - Purpose of review Updates on developments in critical incident monitoring in anaesthesia, and assesses its role in improving patient safety. Recent findings Critical incident reporting has become more widely accepted as an effective way to improve anaesthetic safety, and has continued to highlight the importance of human errors and system failures. The establishment of an international database also improves critical incident reporting. Experiences from the national reporting and learning system in the UK have provided some solutions to the many problems and criticisms faced by the critical incident reporting technique. Direct observations to detect errors are more accurate than voluntary reporting of critical incidents, and may be a promising new approach. Summary Critical incident monitoring is a valuable tool in ensuring patient safety due to its low cost and the ability to provide a comprehensive body of detailed qualitative information. The qualitative information gathered can be used to develop strategies to prevent and manage existing problems, as well as to plan further initiatives for patient safety. Novel approaches should complement existing methods to achieve better results. The development of a culture which emphasises safety should go hand in hand with current audit activities.

    AB - Purpose of review Updates on developments in critical incident monitoring in anaesthesia, and assesses its role in improving patient safety. Recent findings Critical incident reporting has become more widely accepted as an effective way to improve anaesthetic safety, and has continued to highlight the importance of human errors and system failures. The establishment of an international database also improves critical incident reporting. Experiences from the national reporting and learning system in the UK have provided some solutions to the many problems and criticisms faced by the critical incident reporting technique. Direct observations to detect errors are more accurate than voluntary reporting of critical incidents, and may be a promising new approach. Summary Critical incident monitoring is a valuable tool in ensuring patient safety due to its low cost and the ability to provide a comprehensive body of detailed qualitative information. The qualitative information gathered can be used to develop strategies to prevent and manage existing problems, as well as to plan further initiatives for patient safety. Novel approaches should complement existing methods to achieve better results. The development of a culture which emphasises safety should go hand in hand with current audit activities.

    KW - Anaesthesia

    KW - Critical incident

    KW - Patient safety

    KW - Reporting

    UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=43249088383&partnerID=8YFLogxK

    UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=43249088383&partnerID=8YFLogxK

    U2 - 10.1097/ACO.0b013e3282f33592

    DO - 10.1097/ACO.0b013e3282f33592

    M3 - Article

    C2 - 18443485

    AN - SCOPUS:43249088383

    VL - 21

    SP - 183

    EP - 186

    JO - Current Opinion in Anaesthesiology

    JF - Current Opinion in Anaesthesiology

    SN - 0952-7907

    IS - 2

    ER -