Cortical Differential Responses During Divergent Thinking Tasks After Creativity Stimulation

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Creativity is essential in daily decision making and problem solving. It is mainly indicated by divergent thinking tests. Previous studies have revealed the associated brain regions with divergent thinking tasks, but the segregation of functionally specialized cortices to different aspects of divergent thinking has not been explicitly addressed. Thus, this study used a set of functional magnetic resonance imaging paradigms to examine the specific brain regions involved in the aspects of flexibility and originality during alternative use tasks, which mainly indicates divergent thinking skill. Fifty participants were purposely recruited and randomly assigned to 2 groups: the control and experimental groups. The experimental participants underwent creativity stimulation training, whereas the controls were void of it. Subsequently, the participants underwent 3 sessions of functional magnetic resonance imaging screening, in which they need to mentally generate basic, alternative, and novel use for everyday objects that were visually presented. All tasks revealed activations in left motor cortices and inferior and superior parietal lobules, and right inferior temporal gyrus, caudate nucleus, frontal gyri, postcentral gyrus, and insula. Differential responses of alternative use generation to basic use retrieval revealed activations in bilateral superior frontal gyrus and caudate nucleus and left insula (p FWE < .05). Differential responses of generation of novel use to alternative use revealed bilateral supramarginal gyrus, left angular gyrus, inferior frontal gyrus, and right precentral gyrus activation. These findings suggested a different set of cortical region to integrate the cognitive processes involved in divergent thinking in terms of flexibility and originality and that the interaction between these regions is essential to allow execution of cognitive tasks with higher demands of creativity.

Original languageEnglish
JournalPsychology and Neuroscience
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jan 2019

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Creativity
Parietal Lobe
Caudate Nucleus
Prefrontal Cortex
Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Somatosensory Cortex
Motor Cortex
Brain
Frontal Lobe
Temporal Lobe
Decision Making
Thinking
Control Groups

Keywords

  • Alternative use task
  • Differential activation
  • Divergent thinking
  • Flexibility
  • Fluency

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience(all)
  • Neuropsychology and Physiological Psychology

Cite this

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title = "Cortical Differential Responses During Divergent Thinking Tasks After Creativity Stimulation",
abstract = "Creativity is essential in daily decision making and problem solving. It is mainly indicated by divergent thinking tests. Previous studies have revealed the associated brain regions with divergent thinking tasks, but the segregation of functionally specialized cortices to different aspects of divergent thinking has not been explicitly addressed. Thus, this study used a set of functional magnetic resonance imaging paradigms to examine the specific brain regions involved in the aspects of flexibility and originality during alternative use tasks, which mainly indicates divergent thinking skill. Fifty participants were purposely recruited and randomly assigned to 2 groups: the control and experimental groups. The experimental participants underwent creativity stimulation training, whereas the controls were void of it. Subsequently, the participants underwent 3 sessions of functional magnetic resonance imaging screening, in which they need to mentally generate basic, alternative, and novel use for everyday objects that were visually presented. All tasks revealed activations in left motor cortices and inferior and superior parietal lobules, and right inferior temporal gyrus, caudate nucleus, frontal gyri, postcentral gyrus, and insula. Differential responses of alternative use generation to basic use retrieval revealed activations in bilateral superior frontal gyrus and caudate nucleus and left insula (p FWE < .05). Differential responses of generation of novel use to alternative use revealed bilateral supramarginal gyrus, left angular gyrus, inferior frontal gyrus, and right precentral gyrus activation. These findings suggested a different set of cortical region to integrate the cognitive processes involved in divergent thinking in terms of flexibility and originality and that the interaction between these regions is essential to allow execution of cognitive tasks with higher demands of creativity.",
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author = "Hamid, {Khairiah Abdul} and Yusoff, {Ahmad Nazlim} and Saemah Rahman and Osman, {Syazarina Sharis} and Azmi, {Najwa Hanis} and Shahlan Surat and {Ahmad Marzuki}, Maziah",
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