Correlation between hotspots and air quality in Pekanbaru, Riau, Indonesia in 2006-2007

Adelin Anwar, Ju Neng Liew, Mohamed Rozali Othman, Mohd Talib Latif

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

17 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Biomass burning is one of the main sources of air pollution in South East Asia, predominantly during the dry period between June and October each year. Sumatra and Kalimantan, Indonesia, have been identified as the regions connected to biomass burning due to their involvement in agricultural activities. In Sumatra, the Province of Riau has always been found to have had the highest number of hotspots during haze episodes. This study aims to determine the concentration of five major pollutants (PM10, SO2, NO 2, CO and 03) in Riau, Indonesia, for 2006 and 2007. It will also correlate the level of air pollutants to the number of hot spots recorded, using the hot spot information system introduced by the Malaysian Centre for Remote Sensing (MACRES). Overall, the concentration of air pollutants recorded was found to increase with the number of hot spots. Nevertheless, only the concentration of PM10 during a haze episode is significantly different when compared to its concentration in non-haze conditions. In fact, in August 2006, when the highest number of hotspots was recorded the concentration of PM10 was found to increase by more than 20% from its normal concentration. The dispersion pattern, as simulated by the Hybrid Single Particle Lagrangian Integrated Trajectory Model (HYSPLIT), showed that the distribution of PM10 was greatly influenced by the wind direction. Furthermore, the particles had the capacity to reach the Peninsular Malaysia within 42 hours of emission from the point sources as a consequence of the South West monsoon.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)169-174
Number of pages6
JournalSains Malaysiana
Volume39
Issue number2
Publication statusPublished - Apr 2010

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haze
biomass burning
air quality
wind direction
point source
monsoon
information system
atmospheric pollution
trajectory
remote sensing
pollutant
air pollutant
particle
Asia
province
distribution

Keywords

  • Air quality
  • Biomass burning
  • Hotspots
  • Hysplitmodel

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • General

Cite this

Correlation between hotspots and air quality in Pekanbaru, Riau, Indonesia in 2006-2007. / Anwar, Adelin; Liew, Ju Neng; Othman, Mohamed Rozali; Latif, Mohd Talib.

In: Sains Malaysiana, Vol. 39, No. 2, 04.2010, p. 169-174.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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