Corporate social responsibility (CSR) from shipping companies in the straits of Malacca and Singapore

Wan Siti Adibah Wan Dahalan, Zinatul Ashiqin Zainol, Noor Inayah Yaa'kub, Noridayu Md Kassim

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

According to the World Business Council for Sustainable Development, Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) is the continuing commitment by businesses to behave ethically and contribute to economic development while improving the quality of life of the workforce, the local community and society at large. The Straits of Malacca and Singapore, which connect the Indian Ocean with the South China Sea and the Pacific Ocean is considered one of the busiest waterways in the world, a vital trade and communication link to the international shipping community. In 2010 the Malaysian Marine Department recorded traffic of 74,136 ships through the Klang Vessel Traffic System (VTS). The high vessel-traffic in these waters presents regulatory and operational challenges, not the least of which are the risk of accidents and the need to maintain effective navigational systems. By virtue of Article 41, 42 and 43 of the 1982 LOSC, the burden of responsibility lies on the Strait States, especially in regard to navigational safety and pollution prevention. The case is argued in this article, however, for User States, contributing to the maintenance of safety of the Straits of Malacca and Singapore. This article analyses the concept of CSR and how it is adopted by the User States, i.e., the shipping companies. The findings reveal that CSR of the shipping companies is addressed through voluntary contributions and cooperative mechanisms. The CSR also complies with relevant laws and regulations related to safety and pollution (for example MARPOL 73/78, SOLAS 1974, International Safety Management Code). The concepts of voluntary contribution and cooperative mechanism are derived from obligations established under Article 43 of the 1982 LOSC.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)197-208
Number of pages12
JournalInternational Journal of Business and Society
Volume13
Issue number2
Publication statusPublished - 2012

Fingerprint

Shipping
Singapore
Corporate Social Responsibility
Safety
Voluntary contributions
Workforce
Obligation
Quality of life
Economic development
Responsibility
Communication
Pollution
Water
Ship
Accidents
Indian Ocean
Sustainable development
China
Pollution prevention
Local communities

Keywords

  • Corporate social responsibility
  • The 1982 law of the sea
  • The straits of malacca and singapore

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Economics and Econometrics
  • Finance
  • Strategy and Management
  • Business and International Management

Cite this

Corporate social responsibility (CSR) from shipping companies in the straits of Malacca and Singapore. / Wan Dahalan, Wan Siti Adibah; Zainol, Zinatul Ashiqin; Yaa'kub, Noor Inayah; Kassim, Noridayu Md.

In: International Journal of Business and Society, Vol. 13, No. 2, 2012, p. 197-208.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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